How to identify the Virtual Adapter of the Management OS?

Environment: HyperV on Windows Server 2008

My understanding of how virtual network works is the following: when you create a External virtual switch in HyperV Manager, this virtual switch binds itself to the physical adapter of the server. When you configure this virtual switch, a virtual adapter is created on the Management OS and on All guest Virtual Machines. The Management OS and the Virtual Machines use their pertaining virtual adapter to communicate with the Virtual switch (which is bounded to the Physical NIC of the server) to communicate with the physical network. Please correct me if I am wrong.

In order for me to assign a static IP to my Virtual Machines, I will need to connect to the machine itself and configure its respective "virtual" adapter.

My question is, how can I identify the virtual adapter of the management OS to configure it statically?
LuiLui77Asked:
Who is Participating?

[Product update] Infrastructure Analysis Tool is now available with Business Accounts.Learn More

x
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

Santosh GuptaCommented:
You can try to use the following PowerShell script, it utilizes WMI to find out if machine is virtual machine or physical machine.


gwmi -q "select * from win32_computersystem"
0
Cliff GaliherCommented:
That isn't really accurate. Hyper-V will associate the selected NIC to the virtual switch when an external network is created. But virtual adapters for the VMs must be added manually.

As for the management OS, yes, a virtual adapter is created by default and is an active participant on the virtual switch.

As far as identifying adapters, if you view properties, it is pretty easy. The physical adapter will ONLY be bound to the "virtual network switch protocol." Don't touch any settings on that adapter.

The virtual adapter will have all of the usual bindings to TCP/IP, client networking, etc. You'd make changes there.

Now with that said, the preferred configuration is to have one physical NIC not associated with any Hyper-V external networks. That NIC will therefore not be bound to any virtual switches and can be changed and managed just as if hyper-v were not installed. And even better, it will be dedicated to the management OS, so even if something goes wrong with hyper-v's virtual switches (it happens), you have management access to the OS. Which makes the whole virtual adapter issue moot.
0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
LuiLui77Author Commented:
Ok Cliff, thanks. I can see it better now, but in regards to the virtual network adapter that I have to configure manually on every virtual machine, I never had to do so. The only thing that I do is to select the virtual network switch to use on the Network adapter option under Hardware. Is this considered as configuring the virtual network adapter manually?
0
Cliff GaliherCommented:
Yes. Creating the virtual switch did not add those adapters. They were there already. And as you are selecting the switch, those adapters were not auto configured or changed when you created the switch either.
0
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Windows Server 2008

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.