Enterprise grade IDE hard disk

What is the best quality, highest reliability and highest performance IDE hard disk that you can get your hands on these days, that would work when connected to a standard IDE port on a consumer motherboard?
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Frosty555Asked:
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Michael OrtegaSales & Systems EngineerCommented:
Highest performance and IDE can't really be used in the same sentence by today's standards. Why not upgrade the system in question? SSD is going to give you highest reliability and performance for a consumer based system and the cost has come down quite a bit.

MO
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dbruntonQuid, Me Anxius Sum?  Illegitimi non carborundum.Commented:
You are not going to find many IDE drives available.

A check at TigerDirect shows 8 and NewEgg 10.

If you are looking for something in your specifications you'll need a converter: something that goes

IDE <--> SATA

Then you've got a full wide range of drives to choose from (including size) plus you can also go to SSD.

These converters do exist eg http://www.ebay.com/bhp/ata-to-sata-adapter
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nobusCommented:
here an example of a 1 TB Sata WD drive :  http://www.pcstats.com/articleview.cfm?articleID=2684

but can you tell us what you want to do?   then we probably can help better - because as said IDE drives aren't sold anymore
anyway, it depends on what you will use it for, a home pc, server, or datastation
you can look at the different models available on WDC (mostly sata)  : www.wdc.com/
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Gerald ConnollyCommented:
IDE/EIDE evolved/renamed into ATA (laterly renamed PATA - parallel ATA) and was subsequently replaced by SATA (Serial ATA), so this would imply either your system is very old and/or your disk is very old, maybe time to upgrade.
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Frosty555Author Commented:
Hi everyone,

This system that I'm trying to upgrade is actually a proprietary computer inside of an arcade video game that is about 10 years old. It essentially is a desktop computer with an AM2 socket motherboard, DDR RAM, and an IDE hard drive (no SATA ports unfortunately). The system runs a proprietary build of Debian linux which has a very limited set of drivers (but also has some proprietary drivers that talk to a controller card which connects the system to the rest of the arcade machine's controls, lights, and sound system).

Replacing the whole computer isn't really feasible right now, mostly because I don't know how that Debian build would handle the new hardware.

This computer system has a Maxtor 40GB hard disk that is about 7 years old now. We're all concerned that it is going to die at some point fairly soon and want to extend the usable life of the machine by upgrading the hard drive.

The main thing I'm concerned about is that I want to replace the hard disk with another one that I can reasonably expect to last as long as the Maxtor did, and perform just as well. I don't want to replace the hard disk and have it die a year later.

If I were buying a SATA hard disk, I would be aware that the WD Green series disks are a poor choice and have a higher failure rate than, say, a Seagate Constellation ES.3. Is there any such distinction for IDE hard disks? I know they are hard to come by, but out of the disks you can still get your hands on today, are there any that stick out above the rest as "better"?

Or should I just get a Western Digital Blue series IDE disk from NewEgg and be done with it?
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Michael OrtegaSales & Systems EngineerCommented:
Get the disk from Newegg and be done with it. You're not likely to find really any options for IDE that vary in performance and reliability. You might also image your old IDE drive to an external drive or flash drive for safe keep. If the new drive fails you can grab another one and quickly image it with the backup image on your flash drive.

MO
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rindiCommented:
I wouldn't bother too much with the expected Quality of the disk, they all die (and IDE disks never really were meant as enterprise class, for that you had SCSI disks at the time).

I would just rather get a couple of cheap, even 2nd hand IDE disks, clone the system to them, and then you have a stock from which you can replace those gone bad. A single disk then wouldn't have to last that long, and old 40GB disks can probably be acquired cheaply on ebay or similar portals.
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nobusCommented:
hi frosty i have about 6 40 Gb drives here (all tested)
where do you live?  i'm in antwerp - Belgium
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