vmware consolidation process

Hi,


I have a vm running consolidation which seems to be stuck at 99% for over 2 hours now. In the past its never taken more than an hour and I can't turn on the vm at all.

Is there a way to force this consolidation to quit so I can power my vm back on?

Is there any way to see the progress of this consolidation?

Currently running esxi 5.1
dcirona86Asked:
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AbhilashConnect With a Mentor BloggerCommented:
Just wait for it to complete. Sometimes it will take more than usual time depending on the disk capacity.
Do not interrupt it as it will cause data corruption.
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WinsoupCommented:
Try restarting the "VMware Virtual Center Server" Service on your vCenter Server.
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shiva549Connect With a Mentor Commented:
Snapshot consolidation must not be interrupted. Interrupting the process can irretrievably corrupt the vDisk(s) being consolidated.

You can try below commands to monitor the disk consolidation:

Log in as root to the ESX host using SSH. For more information, see Connecting to an ESX host using a SSH client (1019852) or Using Tech Support Mode in ESXi 4.1 and ESXi 5.0 (1017910)
Navigate to the virtual machine directory containing vmdk virtual disk files.
List files in the directory by executing:

# ls -al
Determine any VM_NAME-00000#.vmdk or VM_NAME-00000#-delta.vmdk snapshot files. Look for numbered files following the hyphen(-) in the name. In ESXi 5.5, if the vmdk is larger than 2TB, the snapshot file created is of VM_NAME-00000#-sesparse.vmdk format.
To monitor the VMDK snapshot and base disks which are currently being updated use the following watch command:

# watch -d 'ls -luth | grep -E "delta|flat|sesparse"'

where:

-d highlights the differences between successive updates
t sorts by modification time
l shows a long listing which displays additional file information
u sorts by and shows access time
h prints sizes in a readable format like 1K 234M 2G

You can also run the following command to monitor the time stamp update of the base disks to confirm if the process is working or not.

ls -lrt |grep -E "flat|delta|sesparse"

This command monitors the contents of a directory and displays files by their modification date.
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