Solved

Converting Access 2000 Database to Access 2003

Posted on 2014-03-05
11
514 Views
Last Modified: 2014-03-07
Experts,

I need to convert an Access 2000 Database to Access 2003.  Does anyone know the best way to do this?
0
Comment
Question by:morinia
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • +2
11 Comments
 
LVL 2

Assisted Solution

by:gdarcan
gdarcan earned 62 total points
ID: 39907839
Try opening it in Access 2003 and re-save. I didn't try this at all but most of the cases this method works in Microsoft softwares. They are generally backwards compatible.
0
 
LVL 84
ID: 39907844
As I wrote in your other question, the default format for 2003 was Access 2000, so in most cases no conversion is needed.
0
 
LVL 47

Expert Comment

by:Dale Fye (Access MVP)
ID: 39907895
I'm surprised that you would choose to go to 2003, since that application is over 10 years old and there are three newer (4 if you count Office 365) versions.  Your 2000 data is still accessible in the .mdb format, even with an Office 2007/2010 front end.
0
 
LVL 34

Assisted Solution

by:PatHartman
PatHartman earned 125 total points
ID: 39910231
Open the application in A2003 and in the save dialog, make sure you select the correct format.

A2010 or A2013 would be a better choice.  If all your users do not have the latest version of Access, you can use the FREE Access runtime engine to allow the users to run the apps you create for them.
0
 

Author Comment

by:morinia
ID: 39910355
Experts,

I have noticed a proclvity on my machine.  I see Access 2003 and Access 2010 installed on my machine.  However, when I create a new Access Database it is Access 2000.

As stated earlier I am runnng on Windows 7.  

Why would a new access Database be Access 2000?
0
Maximize Your Threat Intelligence Reporting

Reporting is one of the most important and least talked about aspects of a world-class threat intelligence program. Here’s how to do it right.

 
LVL 84
ID: 39910439
[3rd times the charm, perhaps]

The default format for 2003 was Access 2000. If you create a .mdb file using 2007/2010, the format for THAT is 2000. I don't think you can save a .mdb file created in 2007/2010 in a format other than 2000, but I've never tried to do it.
0
 

Author Comment

by:morinia
ID: 39910485
Scott,

I have some databases that say Access 2000 and others that say Access 2003.  There is an option to convert from Access 2000 to Access 2003 -2007.

But thanks for explaining why my new databases are Access 2000.  When I read that Access 2000 is not compatible with Windows 7, do you know what that means?

Is is the Access database or the Access Application.  I am running Windows 7.
0
 
LVL 84

Assisted Solution

by:Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE )
Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE ) earned 63 total points
ID: 39910522
I would expect they mean the Access application (i.e. the Form and Report designer, query designer, etc) are not compatible. There are still plenty of databases out there that use the .mdb format, and run fine on Windows 7. I have one running on my Win7 64-bit box right now, in fact.

Is this a DATA ONLY database - that is, not but Tables? Or does it also have Forms, Reports, etc?

If it has the Forms and stuff, then as fyed mentions you're treading on dangerous ground in regards to reliability with those older formats. MSFT hasn't support your combination in a long time, so you're just asking for troubles. As Pat mentioned the new Runtimes are free, so you could upsize the database to 2010 (at least), and then deploy the 2010 runtime to your users, and they could run your database.

If it doesn't have forms and reports, then you're back to the same old-same old : upgrading to the 2003 format isn't going to get you anywhere, since the TABLES would still be in the 2000 format.

Your other question lists an error with a validation rule. Did you ever look into that?
0
 

Author Comment

by:morinia
ID: 39910597
Scott,

Thanks for you patience.  There are no validation rules in the database.  That was one of the first things I searched for.

In essence, every program is using the same logic to create an update statement and then update.

It is only this database/program that has the error.  When the same SQL statement is executed in a newly created database, it works fine.  This is both inside of a macro and through SQL.

This is why when I noticed it was Access 2000, I thought that was the issue.  However, I noticed most all of the Databases are Access 2000 except for one.  

I am going to have someone else run the application from their PC to see if there is an issue unrelated to Windows 7 and my pc configuration or there is another problem and it just happend to surface when I started running the job.

I want to rule out all scenarios.
0
 
LVL 34

Accepted Solution

by:
PatHartman earned 125 total points
ID: 39910778
These are the save options from A2010
Save Options
0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:morinia
ID: 39912329
There may have been some corruption when the database was restored.  However, through all of your responses I have learned about the different versions of Microsoft Access.  

There will be a conversion process of upgrading these programs to Access 2010 which is currently available on our site.
0

Featured Post

Complete VMware vSphere® ESX(i) & Hyper-V Backup

Capture your entire system, including the host, with patented disk imaging integrated with VMware VADP / Microsoft VSS and RCT. RTOs is as low as 15 seconds with Acronis Active Restore™. You can enjoy unlimited P2V/V2V migrations from any source (even from a different hypervisor)

Join & Write a Comment

The first two articles in this short series — Using a Criteria Form to Filter Records (http://www.experts-exchange.com/A_6069.html) and Building a Custom Filter (http://www.experts-exchange.com/A_6070.html) — discuss in some detail how a form can be…
Regardless of which version on MS Access you are using, one of the harder data-entry forms to create is one where most data from previous entries needs to be appended to new records, especially when there are numerous fields and records involved.  W…
Get people started with the utilization of class modules. Class modules can be a powerful tool in Microsoft Access. They allow you to create self-contained objects that encapsulate functionality. They can easily hide the complexity of a process from…
Polish reports in Access so they look terrific. Take yourself to another level. Equations, Back Color, Alternate Back Color. Write easy VBA Code. Tighten space to use less pages. Launch report from a menu, considering criteria only when it is filled…

759 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question

Need Help in Real-Time?

Connect with top rated Experts

20 Experts available now in Live!

Get 1:1 Help Now