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Web Application Framework

How do you select a WAF to build applications? In addition, what is the effort from one WAF to another?
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Sunny101
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Sunny101
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1 Solution
 
mankowitzCommented:
Wow..

That's a really difficult question to answer because there are many many options and it depends on many things. It's sort of like asking which girl should I marry?

The truth is that if you are properly motivated, nearly any framework will do what you want. (Girls, too, but that's a separate discussion.)

The first step is to ask yourself what your strengths are. If you are a fantastic programmer in php, I would start with a php-based framework. If you are madly in love with vb.net, then you should go to an ASP.NET model.

My current favorite framework (which only beta released) is meteor, which is all javascript and node.js

After you have answered that, the next question is to ask what you want your site to do. What sort of database do you want to interact with. Do you have any constraints at all? Are you stuck with a particular OS?

All that being said, you should probably go with ruby on rails.
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Sunny101Author Commented:
Thanks for quick response! If  a company currently has   Java (Struts2, Spring) based platform and they would like to adopt best practices and develop roadmap for next 5 years. How do you evaluate different WAF and come up with one that they can use for building web apps?
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Loganathan NatarajanLAMP DeveloperCommented:
Really, it is depending upon your decisions only.  It can't be just others suggestion.

Because choosing right framework for your application depends on your project needs, size, hosting, delivery time, developers exp., costing involved.
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mankowitzCommented:
There's a really good comparison of some frameworks at http://zeroturnaround.com/rebellabs/the-curious-coders-java-web-frameworks-comparison-spring-mvc-grails-vaadin-gwt-wicket-play-struts-and-jsf/ which might be useful. Spring has a relatively steep learning curve, and if your company has already invested in it, that seems like the right way to go.

The only thing that might derail that plan is if there is a particularly cool must-have functionality that you see in another framework. HOWEVER, this is very unlikely as Spring is the granddaddy of frameworks, It has the largest support base and it also has the most sub-projects.

Stick with what you know, spring+struts.
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