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Can't access a windows share from different sub net? - 400pnts

Ok so I have

Windows 2008 server running inside a 2012 server as a VM, folder setup as "share" on the 2008 box can be seen fine on the local sublet 192.168.2.0 - but computers on 192.168.3.0 and 192.168.5.0 cant see this particular machine on the network but ths can see all the others.

I can ping the FQDN on the computer from the other subnets but I can't telnet to it on port 23 (Not sure if that helps)

I looking for a push in the right direction - a tool that might help me figure out why its falining any ideas
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Ian Price
Asked:
Ian Price
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1 Solution
 
aa-denverCommented:
Check the subnet mask in TCP/IP properties for the 2008 server.
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Fred MarshallPrincipalCommented:
Most likely the Windows firewall settings on the server side.
Since Windows 7, the firewall has to be set up to allow other subnet's access for File and Printer sharing.
See the attached for instructions.  The firewalls are all either very similar or identical.
Windows-7-File-and-Printer-Shari.pdf
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aa-denverCommented:
Because computers can get to the share if on the same subnet, but can't get to the share if on a different subnet, it is most likely the subnet mask.  Sharing and permissions are validated because computers on the same subnet can get to the share.  This scenario also holds true for a ping.  Computers from another subnet can ping the server with the wrong subnet mask, but to telnet, they need a return connection.  The computer with the wrong subnet mask cannot find it's way back to make a complete round-trip connection.  The same is true with file sharing.  Your symptom is a classic example of wrong subnet mask, so please check that.   Here is a web link.

https://learningnetwork.cisco.com/thread/14887
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aa-denverCommented:
I can't remember if SP1 needs another forestprep and right now I can't find that on the web.   My suggestion is to run the prep and see if it does anything.  It doesn't hurt to run adprep many times.   Microsoft adpreps are intelligent enough to determine if the requirements are already met.   When you launch SP1 install it may go through a prerequisite check anyway and tell you if you need to run the prep.

Here's an article:  http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb125224(v=exchg.150).aspx

If you don't have your own test lab, it would be worth your while to build one.  You can even use a fairly new desktop and install 2008 R2 or 2012 R2 hyper-v on it.  Most newer desktops will support 8 gb RAM which is enough for testing.  You can have a DC, an exchange server, a file server etc.  For testing  purposes 1 or 1.5 GB of RAM for each vm is enough.  I even know consultants who use a virtual environment on a laptop.  30 GB virtual hard disks are adequate for testing the OS and even installing Exchange.  Just spin up a virtual DC, dcpromo it to a new test domain, and start adding other vms to your test domain.
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Ian PriceIT ManagerAuthor Commented:
Turn out to be a firewall setting in the AV
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