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Exchange 2010 - 2013 Migration missing mailbox.

I recently migrated a multi-tenant Exchange 2010 SP3 setup to Exchange 2013 SP1, as part of a project to reuse equipment not being fully utilized and to move towards a visualized setp.

Exchange 2010 was running on Server 2008 R2 with AD DS role all on one server, I created 2 x 2012 R2 servers, one for DC & DNS, one for Exchange 2013 SP1 to have the CAS and MB role installed.

The namespace was kept, after the new CAS was succesfully allowing proxy to the old 2010 mailboxes, all client mailboxes were successfully moved to the new 2013 database.

One of the checks I did before uninstalling Exchange 2010, was that get-mailbox list showed all databases listed on the new database.  All clients were working with no complaints.  I've uninstalled Exchange 2010, demoted the DC, removed the member server and no it's a standalone blank 2008 R2 waiting to be wiped for a new role.

I've been told today following that, that one user can't access his mail, she is an OWA user only, upon checking ECP I can see that user no longer is listed with a mailbox.  The user is still listed in the tenant AD OU along with his other colleagues whom are working fine.

Inspecting ADSI of that user shows it is still enabled with his e-mail address and pointing at the mailbox name hosted on Exchange 2013, but I have no idea where it is gone.  Logging onto OWA results with.  Also trying to mail enable that user does not bring that user up with a list, Exchange thinks it is already mail enabled.

A problem occurred while you were trying to use your mailbox.
X-OWA-Error: Microsoft.Exchange.Data.Storage.ObjectNotFoundException
X-OWA-Version: 15.0.847.32.

Is this recoverable, I would like to understand what has gone wrong with this 1 user out of hundreds.  Should I just delete the AD user and start again as I can't setup a new Exchange user with the correct SMTP e-mail address as it is currently taken.

I'm looking at what recovery options I have, including the DPM that was protecting.

Thanks
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Robert_Turner
Asked:
Robert_Turner
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2 Solutions
 
Simon Butler (Sembee)ConsultantCommented:
Exchange 2010 wouldn't have allowed you to uninstall if a mailbox was still on the system - it is one of the checks it makes. Therefore the problem has to have occurred after the move.
If the account is still there, then it sounds like either it was mail disabled or something else went wrong, perhaps with AD replication. If you look at the account through adsiedit, does it show any Exchange attributes?

Simon
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Robert_TurnerAuthor Commented:
That's exactly what I thought Simon, I knew it would object if I left anything behind, it does have Exchange attributes, yes, but I have modified them the SMTP address so I can get this person working again to free up the mail address for a brand new mailbox.  It was objecting the address was already in existence when I first tried to to that.

I haven't deleted the original AD account, just renamed it to (.broken) for the time being.
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Robert_TurnerAuthor Commented:
I've also done a get-messagetrackinglog specifying today, I can see e-mail being delivered with the new server specified.  So why can't I see it in ECP anywhere.
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Robert_TurnerAuthor Commented:
I managed to get to the bottom of it, comparing ADSI attributes with a working user showed missing information, such as home server, and exchangemdb, etc.  Although you didn't give me the fix you certainly gave me inspiration that led me to the fix and will award points.

I would love to understand how this AD Object lost all those attributes after Exchange 2010 uninstall.
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Robert_TurnerAuthor Commented:
Suggestion of ADSI attributes led me down the correct path to discover the issue.
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Simon Butler (Sembee)ConsultantCommented:
Why did that get a C grade then?
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Robert_TurnerAuthor Commented:
You didn't give me the actual fix, or tell me which exact attributes to look at, it took some time comparing a working mailbox to the broken one to spot what information was missing or the fact there was missing attributes in the first place.  My understanding of the grading system is that the score should be relevant to how close the actual fix it was.  I was quite tempted to self accept my own answer but I thought some points would be appropriate.
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Simon Butler (Sembee)ConsultantCommented:
I refer you to the grading guidelines.
http://support.experts-exchange.com/customer/portal/articles/481419

I don't think a C grade is appropriate here, but I have asked a moderator to intervene.

I always challenge C grades, I don't think in the almost ten years I have been using EE I have seen one given to me which was deserved.

Simon.
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