Why do i need to add the property .value

If I have strTest = Range("a100") then "" is assigned to strTest
strTest = Range("a100") .Value then strTest is assigned a value

Can someone educate me on when I would not use .Value ?  Is .Value only needed if I doing a test compare ?
upobDaPlayaAsked:
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byundtConnect With a Mentor Commented:
upobDaPlaya,
In the example you cited, the variable ws is fully qualified, so you could write your code like this:
Set wb = ThisWorkbook 
Set ws = wb.Worksheets("Sheet1")
With ws
      strTest = .Range("A100") .Value 

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In the last statement, note the dot in front of Range. That dot makes an implicit reference to ws. Without that dot, Range("A100").Value refers to the value of cell A100 on whichever worksheet is active--and that may not necessarily be Sheet1.

You can also set your With block up all at once. You might do this if you don't need to refer to either wb or ws in other parts of your code.
With ThisWorkbook.Worksheets("Sheet1")
     strTest = .Range("A100").Value

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An unqualified reference might still be interpreted correctly if ThisWorkbook happens to be active and Sheet1 is the active worksheet. I agree with Kevin that this is not a good practice. Better to fully qualify than to count on always being lucky.
strTest = Range("A100").Value       'Since Range isn't qualified, it applies to the active worksheet

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Brad
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zorvek (Kevin Jones)Connect With a Mentor ConsultantCommented:
Every object has a default property. In this case the Range object's default property is Value. However, the default value is not ALWAYS used. In some cases the Range object itself will be assigned to the variable.

In general it is good practice to always include the property even if it is the default property. This avoids ambiguity and makes it clear to others looking at your code what you are doing. It's also good practice to qualify everything. The Range object parent is implied in your case. If I were writing the code I would do it like this:

Dim strTest as String
strTest = ThisWorkbook.Sheets("Sheet 1").Range("a100").Value

This way we know exactly what is going on. No ambiguity, including the type of the variable strTest.

Kevin
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upobDaPlayaAuthor Commented:
zorvek..that makes sense, but leads to another question..above my line I provided in the initial post I also have
Set wb = ThisWorkbook
Set ws = wb.Worksheets("Sheet1")
With ThisWorkbook.Sheets("Sheet1")
strTest = Range("a100") .Value
........................................
...........................................
End With

When do I need to set and do I need to explicity name my wb and ws in the with line if I use your line of code ?
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upobDaPlayaAuthor Commented:
If I have another sub that use the variable wb and ws I assume I need to declare wb and ws in this other sub
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byundtCommented:
You can pass wb or ws to the other sub as variables. Otherwise, you need to declare them and set them in that other sub.

Sub Sub1()
Dim wb As Workbook
Dim ws As Worksheet
Set wb = ActiveWorkbook
Set ws = wb.Worksheets("Sheet1")
Call Sub2 ws       'Upon return, ws will be named Sheet13
End Sub

Sub Sub2(wksht As Worksheet)
wksht.Name = "Sheet13"
End Sub

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upobDaPlayaAuthor Commented:
Very well explained and fantastic examples.  The "Best Practices" suggestions our great for my Excel foundation...many thanks
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