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backup

Posted on 2014-03-11
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Last Modified: 2014-04-21
Hi,

what the best practice to backup your servers such as the DC, storage, application, and etc.

thanks,

jessie
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Question by:JessIT2013
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6 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:kobi19860
ID: 39920111
hi
there is alot of options to do that:
first ques: is your dc in vm enviroment?
are you wish to save the backups on tape or on your san/NAS SERVER?
thx
kobi
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Author Comment

by:JessIT2013
ID: 39920192
Hi Kobi,

no vm. what about using an external drives and we can't afford san/nas server as of now. for the meantime I'm using NTbackup and stored it into external drives.

thanks,
jess
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Expert Comment

by:kobi19860
ID: 39920300
what os on your dc : 2003/2008?
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Author Comment

by:JessIT2013
ID: 39922707
it's 2003.
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Expert Comment

by:kobi19860
ID: 39922732
ok
so i will suggest you to buy an external usb device like 3TB to save the
backups full and incrementals,and if you have alittle money i will suggest this:
http://www.uranium-backup.com/purchase-uranium-backup/
you can buy the gold edition in 290$ and backup your server as image(bare metal restore)+
backups all your folders + backups sql on the networks+backups exchange server+
backup vm machines+ with advanced backup method.

also there is another one: http://www.backupassist.com/index.html
 but if your budget is low:
http://www.backup4all.com/
http://www.disk-image.com/order.htm - server to image

kobi
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LVL 21

Accepted Solution

by:
SelfGovern earned 500 total points
ID: 39923597
Questions you need to answer:
1) How much data can you afford to lose for each application/system?  Called Recovery Point Objective or RPO.  Some businesses can afford to lose a day's worth of email, but their order-taking system must be able to lose no more than the last transaction, or the last minute's worth of transactions (for instance).  This will be different for each business, and for each system you run.
2) How long can you afford to be down while you restore your systems?   Called Recovery Time Objective or RTO.  Again, some systems might have to be back up and running with no downtime, others might be able to wait for a day or longer before they are up again.
3) What's your budget?   Ideally, you take into consideration the RTO and RPO and figure out how much it would cost to exceed those... then start pricing solutions that meet your RTO and RPO while staying in your budget.  If you can't find something that meets the budget, you either increase your budget, or you change your RTO and.or RPO so that you can find a solution meeting your budget.

Other considerations include "How long do I have to keep this data?"  Some data is pretty transitory -- you might nonly need it for a few days, or until after your month-end close.  Other data might need to be kept for years (contract-related data that might be needed in case you get sued (or sue someone) for not living up to a contract), or decades (government records, patient info, etc.)

If you have a need to keep data for years or longer, you need to make sure your selected backup method will keep the data that long.  I know that backup to disk is all the rage, but as a rule, disk is not suitable for long-term storage of data.  In that case, either backing up to disk and copying archive data to tape, or just backing up to tape, is a better solution.

Also remember that you will probably want to keep multiple copies of your backup data in multiple locations, so make sure that your solution allows you to do this easily.
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