Potential security breaches in IS. How to stay on a safe side?

Dear All,

We do a review of applications installed on employee's personal computers and found that one of employees uses Pando Media Booster. We learned that it might be using file sharing protocol (BitTorrent) that can compromise information security in our organization.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pando_(application)

1. Is our conclusion correct?
2. Is there any proved method to classify spyware?
3. Is there any proved knowledge base that clearly states what software can be potential security breach?

Thanks in advance
ITm1010Asked:
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gheistCommented:
It has its own purposes, like with any other file transfer facility (including web browser) sure it can leak any information user has access to.
No you cannot clasify all implementations of bittorrent protocol as spyware because it is not.
Ask your AV vendor on how to make a custom signature that does this misclasification...
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skullnobrainsCommented:
1) like gheist said, no, or rather not more than allowing ftp, email, or roughly any protocol that can transfer a file not speaking about cds, usb keys and other removable media

if i read the wikipedia link, it seems you should be much more afraid of the virus that is supposed to have been bundled with updates for months, and the bandwidth cost of such tools.

2) yeah plenty : they all prooved to be inefficient at best

3) yes : any software that you don't need and explicitly allow should be considered as a threat.

you'll find lists of "safe" software to be useful, but trying to list dangerous software exhaustively is foolish at best. any script kiddie can generate a new version of a dangerous software with minor differences and a different name automatically a zillion time per day. morphing viruses do so automatically.
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gheistCommented:
Hey (3) - the owner who BYOD-s needs the software and enjoys it...
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