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How get rid of second comma in a concatenated field if there is no data in the 2nd field

Posted on 2014-03-15
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Last Modified: 2014-03-15
I have this syntaxin a query designer field but need to get rid of the 2nd comma if there is no data in the field "Address2)

Street Address: [Address1] & IIf([Address2]="","",", " & [Address2])

Right as it stands I get, for example,

1234 West Circle Drive,

but want to get just

1234 West Circle Drive  (no comma)


What is wrong with my syntax?

--Steve
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Question by:SteveL13
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Accepted Solution

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Dale Fye earned 500 total points
ID: 39931629
Generally, the address2 would be NULL not "", if that is the case, you can simply use:

StreetAddress: [Address1] & (", " + [Address2])

The use of the + to concatenate the comma and [Address2] will result in a NULL value if [Address2] is NULL. If you use a '&' to do the concatenation, it would result in ','

If [Address2] could be NULL or an empty string, then I would recommend:

StreetAddress: = [Address1] & IIF([Address2] & "" = "", NULL, ", " & [Address2])
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by:SteveL13
ID: 39931650
Perfect solution.  Thanks.
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