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Can somebody confirm is there a difference between PXE and UEFI PXE from a network point of view. So if I am building and I PXE build it it should look the same over wire given the same machine!


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I am not sure what you are looking for here; but I will try my best.
If you are using PXE for a typical setup, then typically pxelinux would be provided to the machine as a boot loader.

If you're using UEFI, then elilo would be used instead. If you are going to just be booting UEFI or PXE then there is no real special configuration needed. But if you intend to be able to boot and load BOTH, then extra configuration would be needed. Primarily from the DHCP server.

Other than the packets that are going to be going through the line and what is contained in their headers and the information encapsulated; you aren't going to notice much of a difference otherwise.
It's all in the implementation, so it depends on your computer firmware (BIOS/UEFI).
Most UEFI implementations do not have a real PXE "rom" and use BIOS-based PXE in emulation mode.
Regarding the network point-of-view, BIOS/PXE and UEFI/PXE should be the same. However, UEFI could make it possible to have some more flexibility in PXE config such as customizing some fields/options of the PXE/DHCP packets sent by PXE code. Yet I never saw any computer with UEFI/PXE implementation that made it really possible.

Can you elaborate a little more what you are trying to do? Are you trying to build some customized PXE code (iPXE-based maybe) or are you just trying to PXE-boot some machines and wondering if they should be BIOS/PXE or UEFI/PXE or if it does not matter?
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