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Need help filtering an excel file

Posted on 2014-03-19
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Last Modified: 2014-03-28
I have a spreadsheet with many systems names in column A, but there are alot of duplicates. Problem these duplicates are there because in column B there are version numbers for each of the system names.

Now I need to remove any systems what have a version number of 17 and higher in column B, no these same system can have version numbers below 17, but is they have any numbers above 17, then I need to remove the system names completely regardless if they have version 17 and below.

I need to be left with system names that have version number 16 and below only.

Am I making sense. :)
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Question by:rdefino
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6 Comments
 
LVL 39

Expert Comment

by:nutsch
ID: 39939999
add a column with a formula like this:

=countifs(columnwithversionnumber,">=17",columnwithsystem,systemvalue)>0

e.g. if your version number is in column B and the system number in A, the formula in row 2 would be:

=countifs(B:B,">=17",A:A,A2)>0

and filter on true values

Thomas
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Author Comment

by:rdefino
ID: 39940028
So i used formula =countifs(B:B,">=17",A:A,A2)>0

But i show true for all types f versions and fales for all types. Still the duplicate names exists.

Not sure if I did it right.

Should i use both formulas or just one.
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Author Comment

by:rdefino
ID: 39940044
also, some of the version numbers show as below. we can rewove anything after the first octet.

20.0.1
3.6.17
25.0.1
19
21
23
23.0.1
25
27.0.1
3.6.17
3.6.17
3.6.17
3.6.17
0
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LVL 39

Expert Comment

by:nutsch
ID: 39940145
OK, the easiest then is to add another column that will turn your version number into a main version number, with the following formula, and then use that column to check if the version number is above 17 or not.

=--LEFT(B2,IFERROR(FIND(".",B2)-1,LEN(B2)))

Thomas
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Author Comment

by:rdefino
ID: 39940158
I added that in a column and the number 12 appeared. What does that mean? I tried it on a number of different version and it always shows 12.

I have attached and example of the spreadsheet that I'm working with.
example.xlsx
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LVL 39

Accepted Solution

by:
nutsch earned 1220 total points
ID: 39940173
Here's how I'd put the formulas in your sample
example.xlsx
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