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How do I set up my Windows 7 machine so I can send emails from a locally installed mail server for development purposes?

Hi:

I have a Windows 7 Professional machine (IIS7).
For development/testing purposes, I would like to set up this machine to
send email from my .Net based applications.

I've done some googling, but am still pretty unclear as how to set this up locally.

Do I need to download/install email server locally on my machine or do I have
everything I need but need to set stuff up through IIS 7?

First time out of the gates trying this, so I apologize if the question/answer seems obvious.

Thanks,
JohnB
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jxbma
Asked:
jxbma
3 Solutions
 
tsaicoCommented:
Generally yes, you will need to set up something to handle the mail traffic to and from and open the appropriate ports on your workstation's software firewall

http://www.smartertools.com/smartermail/mail-server-software.aspx

is a free one or if you would rather the even simpler MS route for Win 7 pro

http://geekswithblogs.net/ferdous/archive/2011/03/15/smtp-setup-for-windows-7.aspx gives you links to install the stuff, then there is a link in the article on how to configure it.
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ITguy565Commented:
Setup an smtp relay on your box then point it to your exchange server.

http://www.softstack.com/freesmtp.html
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Dave HoweSoftware and Hardware EngineerCommented:
you shouldn't really need anything special to set up for that - you need a mail server to send to, but you probably have one of those already (if not, get a free google account :)

if you *want* a local mailserver for test purposes of course, that's different :)
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tsaicoCommented:
If he gets an actual SMTP server, then he do either direction for testing purposes.  Also, another problem with a google account is he would have to make his .Net application be able to sign in, connect, then send, adding complexity and also slowing down the development of his application for something that is most likely not it's focus.  With an internal server he can skip that part for now.  Also, with a gmail, the sending account will be displayed, and to keep thing professional, he may want it to be labeled as "him@hisdomain.com".

And end route, depending on what this application will do, a free gmail account might end up with too many limitations such as how many emails can be sent in a day.

He is better doing the relay route as itguy (though if he had an exchange server, he can turn on relay for this purpose) or my suggestion.
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Dave HoweSoftware and Hardware EngineerCommented:
Yup. however, in the real world, usually an app that you write that needs mail capabilities is going to have to be able to log into and send via some arbitary mail target, so it makes sense to code it that way originally.

earlier versions of IIS allowed you to just drop mails into an arbitrary directory and have the IIS engine send them - which was convenient, but is now depreciated (sadly; I found it quite handy :)
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jxbmaSoftware ConsultantAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the excellent feedback folks!

JB
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