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C#: Generics

I am a beginner in C#, and just started learning about Generics. I was doing some code review and ran across this:
List<string> myList = new List<string>();

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Just by looking at it, how can I determine if it's a generic list or a regular list?

Also, the book says a Generic type's naming convention says the type should start with a T. What if the code is not following normal naming conventions. Is there anything that tells you this is a generic type -- without writing any code to check if it is or isn't.
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pzozulka
Asked:
pzozulka
2 Solutions
 
Craig WagnerSoftware ArchitectCommented:
When you see List<someType> it's a generic type. A regular List doesn't actually exist in the .NET framework. A non-generic list in .NET is an ArrayList.

The naming convention is for when you're creating the generic type, not using it. If you were creating a type to store key/value pairs you might code something like this:

public class KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>
{
    public TKey Key { get; set; }

    public TValue StoredValue { get; set; }
}

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Then when someone went to use your class they would use it as:

KeyValuePair<int, string> = new KeyValuePair<int, string>();

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Now the key always has to be an int and the value has to be a string.
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pzozulkaAuthor Commented:
A regular List doesn't actually exist in the .NET framework.
Are you saying I can't do:
List myL = new List();

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Fernando SotoRetiredCommented:
This, List<string> myList = new List<string>();, defines a strongly typed collections of System.String. The data type inside < and > will determine the type of the collection. A Generic collection will have a place holder for the type such as this, List<T> myList = new List<T>();, Here is a generic function :
static void Swap<T>(ref T lhs, ref T rhs)
{
    T temp;
    temp = lhs;
    lhs = rhs;
    rhs = temp;
}

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To use the above generic function in your code you can do this:
int a = 1;
int b = 2;

Swap<int>(ref a, ref b);
System.Console.WriteLine(a + " " + b);

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Note that when Swap is called it tells the Generic function what the type of T is. This makes the function re-useable by any type and therefore the code needs only to be written only once.

In this example you could also call Swap like so:
Swap(ref a, ref b);

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Because the compiler will infer the data type. By the way T can be anything you want it to be, it is just a place holder for the type.
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käµfm³d 👽Commented:
By the way T can be anything you want it to be...
I would add, though, that there are ways to restrict the type(s) to fitting a certain criteria. Generic type constraints can be used to restrict the types that can be used with your custom generic classes.

**I mention generic type constraints only to make you aware of them. Focus on the basics first. Once you grasp those, then move on to constraints.
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Craig WagnerSoftware ArchitectCommented:
Are you saying I can't do:
List myL = new List();

Have you tried it? What happened when you did? If you're wondering what's going to happen if you try something, just try it. You'll learn more than having someone spoon-feed you the answer. Besides, the compile is a much better compiler than asking people on a forum to compile your code.
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