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Postgre database server.

In my office of 20 users, I am running postgre database server on Windows 2003 server standard edition. Network setup is peer to peer with no  domain or active directory. Now my server is getting old and I am thinking of replacing it with a faster server. Can I use any other OS to host Postgre database?
Reason I like Windows server is its stability and ability to have hardware RAID. If I am going to use any other operating system, it should have those two features. Plus it has be cheaper than Windows Server 2008 or 2012.
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MohammadKhan
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MohammadKhan
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Dan CraciunIT ConsultantCommented:
I'm running Postgres on a CentOS 6.5 VM. 30 users, no performance issues.
The host is Windows Server 2012, but you can also use the free Hyper-V Server 2012.

HTH,
Dan
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MohammadKhanAuthor Commented:
Will I be able to setup RAID on Hyper-V and from where can I get Hyper-V server OS.
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Dan CraciunIT ConsultantCommented:
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-US/evalcenter/dn205299.aspx

You can use the server's physical RAID card to build your arrays. If you need software RAID I think you'll need a full version of Windows Server.

But, if you're not afraid of Linux, you can install CentOS, Debian etc directly on the server and use the software RAID from Linux.
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MohammadKhanAuthor Commented:
I am not comfortable with Linux, plus Linux costs about the same as Windows server 2012. After reading about different server OS and cost comparison , I am leaning more towards Windows 2012 server essentials. Will that work well as Postgres server? I only have 20 users that connect to the database server through workstations that run Windows XP, Windows 2007 and 2008.
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Dan CraciunIT ConsultantCommented:
It should work. Since Postgres is not Microsoft software, I don't think the 25 users limit applies to it.

I would still run Postgres as a virtual machine (if you buy Server Essentials you have the right to install it both on a physical and a virtual server) for the convenience. Next time you want to upgrade your server, you just copy the VM.

PS: since I only work with small clients (under 100 PCs), I never bought an enterprise version of Linux (RedHat or SUSE), so I never paid for Linux. My personal favorite is CentOS for servers. Old, but stable packages.
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