Solved

Win 7 EOL

Posted on 2014-03-24
16
651 Views
Last Modified: 2014-03-25
Hey there,

I'm getting ready to update a few machines from xp to win 7 or 8.1.

I think it will be easier for the teaching staff and me to go windows 7; especially for moving the desktops, favorites, documents.  Although, most of the equipment should run 8 OK , I have a few that are Win7 only.

That said, is the EOL for win7 far enough out that I won't be repeating this in a couple of years?

--SM
0
Comment
Question by:smantz
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • +5
16 Comments
 
LVL 23

Expert Comment

by:Thomas Grassi
ID: 39951876
Windows 7 is still OK

Windows 8.1 is also OK

I would go with 8.1

I would not do an in place upgrade

I would recommend you get a new hard drive and install on that.
0
 
LVL 9

Expert Comment

by:Trenton Knew
ID: 39951878
I'm personally hoping that Windows 9 comes along and let's us all forget about 8 and that it ever happened.  That being said... Windows XP hung around for 14 years or so.  EOL on 7 is January 14, 2020.  I doubt any computers you are using today are still in service come that date.
0
 
LVL 9

Expert Comment

by:Trenton Knew
ID: 39951884
source, btw:

http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/lifecycle

Windows 8, you will waste MUCH time with support and training calls
0
Netscaler Common Configuration How To guides

If you use NetScaler you will want to see these guides. The NetScaler How To Guides show administrators how to get NetScaler up and configured by providing instructions for common scenarios and some not so common ones.

 
LVL 88

Assisted Solution

by:rindi
rindi earned 100 total points
ID: 39951905
Windows 7's EOL is in 2015, but the expected EOL of extended support is expected to be in 2020, so there is still plenty of time.
0
 
LVL 54

Assisted Solution

by:McKnife
McKnife earned 100 total points
ID: 39951951
Let's not confuse EOL (=end of extended support) with the end of Mainstream Support. First one is 2015, last is 2020.

http://www.experts-exchange.com/OS/Microsoft_Operating_Systems/Windows/Windows_7/Q_28379922.html#a39904167 is a rather long explanation of views and factors that play a role.
0
 
LVL 14

Expert Comment

by:ThomasMcA2
ID: 39951993
Windows 8.x is so different from previous versions of Windows that it should be a crime to call it "Windows." Simple functions that users used every day in XP or Win7 are so difficult to find in Win8 that they will require Internet research or a Help Desk call. And that will happen every time they want to do a simple task.

Win7 is intuitive, users like it, and it will be supported for several years. Even if you have to replace or upgrade some of your low-end systems again in a few years, that should be a much smoother experience than trying to use Win8 now.
0
 
LVL 54

Expert Comment

by:McKnife
ID: 39952003
Thomas, I upgraded a dozen users to 8.1 - none of them had any 8.1 experience. They did not generate any additional support time. They all like it - no, I don't work at Microsoft.
People use the programs, not the OS.
0
 
LVL 3

Assisted Solution

by:englanddg
englanddg earned 100 total points
ID: 39952184
I would say stick with 7.  Especially if you have work specific programs.

Here are the reasons why.

1)  IE 11 stinks.  I have had to create GPO entries that basically run pretty much every website my clients use in, not only compatability mode, but also trusted sites mode.  It was bad before IE 11, but now it's just redonkulous.

2)  No start menu.  Now, this you can work around using 3rd party solutions, but really, after nearly 20 years of MS teaching people how to use the Start Menu, who thought it would be a good idea to remove it?  I get the Metro Interface, and yeah, it's nice, especially on a touchscreen.  However, my 55 year old end user just wants to open whatever program they want, and they know Start -> Programs -> Select Program.  They don't want to have to learn to hover in the upper right hand corner, key combinations, how to pin programs to the taskbar, and all that jazz.

3)  Apps.  Nothing is worse then getting a support call because someone was trying to listen to a wav file (like, say, a recorded phone call or a voicemail message that was sent to email) and Media Player decides to open full screen and then they feel "trapped" by the app.  Same goes for Photo Viewer.  There are ways around this, or you can train your users...but honestly, it's not worth the headache.

4)  Metro.  Yep, Metro just stinks for desktops.  It's ok for tablets and phones, but desktops?  Well...the users just aren't there yet.  MS is being stupid in trying to be Apple or even Chrome.  A desktop/laptop should function like one, and a phone/tablet should function like one.  While I enjoy my two Surface units (one work owned for testing, one personally owned)...most users won't and don't.  They aren't ready for it.

On the whole, I find 8 and 8.1 solid OS's...however, Metro and other UI issues combined with IE 11 kill it for me for distribution to a user base I have to support.
0
 
LVL 18

Accepted Solution

by:
web_tracker earned 200 total points
ID: 39952259
90% of the users who have tried windows 8 dislike it, and find it too difficult to learn something so different to what they are using now. I support people in the healthcare/university setting and the users who have tried windows 8 want to go to windows 7 instead. We therefore image all our systems with a windows 7 image, and no longer support windows 8. There is too much training involved, and when I support clients in the health care sector they need to get there systems running the way the want them to yesterday not tomorrow.  I guess if people are used to using an android system they may have some experience using tiles, but those who have not had this experience the windows 8 system was a disaster.
0
 

Author Comment

by:smantz
ID: 39952271
Hey everyone,

Thanks for all the feedback. This is really helps a lot in my decision making process (flip a coin).  Seriously,  I have struggled with this but not having had the time I like to really get to know windows 8 I would probably be doing my faculty, administration and staff a disservice installing a product I'm not really sure I can support at this time.  

As many of you know, being a one person department covering not only the client and server computer administrative and support aspects but, audio/visual, phone, security, electrical, and some mechanical, I need to be able to breath once and a while.

Most of your posts affirm what I thought but I needed to make sure windows 7 is not going away for a little while.

SM
0
 

Author Comment

by:smantz
ID: 39952284
Points increased
0
 

Author Comment

by:smantz
ID: 39952286
increased
0
 
LVL 3

Expert Comment

by:englanddg
ID: 39952288
@McKnife

Ok, so hovering your mouse in the upper right hand corner of their primary monitor until they saw the pop out menu or hitting the windows button...not one of your users had an issue with this?

Not one?

Or, wait...they never had an issue when an App (as MS likes to call them now) took over full screen?

I run 1/3 of my organization on 8, I am quite aware that it's a decent OS, with a terrible UI decision.

I highly doubt your end users were that keen to it.
0
 
LVL 54

Expert Comment

by:McKnife
ID: 39952630
Hi englanddg.

When we migrate OS's, we plan ahead and do trainings (1x 30-minute introduction prior to migration (full audience), another half an hour after two days of using it to answer questions and show some more use cases for small groups of ten users per admin).
That was enough.

When we moved from win2k to vista 6 years back, we did the same. The step from 2k to vista created much more support work than vista->8.1 because back then, we did clean installs, now we upgraded most machines.

When MS sold their promotional copies for 30€ right when 8 came out, I grabbed 5. Installed four of them on friends' machines, not a single one of them had any problems yet that are related to the UI. And those are no techies.

It is no secret that many admins love to debate about it and nearly tear it to pieces, when the UI is discussed. I have no problem with it but was surprised to find how quickly the users adapted to it.
0
 
LVL 3

Expert Comment

by:englanddg
ID: 39953096
@McKnife

I appreciate your thoughts, but honestly, while there was some "culture shock" between Vista and 2k, it's nothing compared to Metro.

It's apples and oranges.

I have about 1/3 of my network on 8, and I get significantly more calls about those systems...and that's WITH training...

Though, a lot of the issues are IE or UI related (not the OS, as I said, I find the OS itself is rather solid).  I will say this about 8...it's one of the easiest OS installs I've ever done.  :P
0
 
LVL 18

Expert Comment

by:web_tracker
ID: 39954007
For us to get the 1000 plus users together especially the doctors together to train everyone is quite impractical as everyone schedule is different. It would be next to impossible to have everyone trained for a mass roll out of window 8. But then again our organization is quite different then many of your places of business as those workers may work 9-5. In a university especially in the when I work with both professors and members in the health care team windows 8 just would not work. We will wait to see what happens with windows 9.
0

Featured Post

Three Reasons Why Backup is Strategic

Backup is strategic to your business because your data is strategic to your business. Without backup, your business will fail. This white paper explains why it is vital for you to design and immediately execute a backup strategy to protect 100 percent of your data.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Today, still in the boom of Apple, PC's and products, nearly 50% of the computer users use Windows as graphical operating systems. If you are among those users who love windows, but are grappling to keep the system's hard drive optimized, then you s…
Possible fixes for Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 updating problem. Solutions mentioned are from Microsoft themselves. I started a case with them from our Microsoft Silver Partner option to open a case and get direct support from Microsoft. If s…
The goal of this Micro Tutorial is to help navigate beginning users with the app store on Windows 8. It will explain exciting features how to maximize your PC through these apps. This will be demonstrated using Windows 8 operating system.
This Micro Tutorial will give you a basic overview of Windows Live Photo Gallery and show you various editing filters and touches to photos you can apply. This will be demonstrated using Windows Live Photo Gallery on Windows 7 operating system.

807 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question