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migration plan for SHA-1 to SHA-2

does anyone have migration plan for SHA-1 to SHA-2?
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btanExec ConsultantCommented:
there is no need to make big change as of now, but as you mentioned is to plan for it. Have small win meaning do everything in the staging on the changes before getting the system owner permission and schedule to implement the changes. It is best to know the system and get the provider to provide the migration of the application in concern and perform impact analysis. The OS migration will be done in concurrent with your server team advices.

Key is identify all the PKI owner and cert owner as they are major owner and player. y take is target the public facing website and those services using SSL/TLS

E.g. Symantec advices - http://www.symantec.com/page.jsp?id=sha2-transition
E.g. Microsoft advisory - http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/security/advisory/2880823

Some MS upgrade sharing to note
- http://blogs.technet.com/b/pki/archive/2013/09/19/upgrade-certification-authority-to-sha256.aspx
- http://blogs.technet.com/b/pki/archive/2011/02/08/common-questions-about-sha2-and-windows.aspx

Keep in mind the process which Windows uses to build certificate chains.  A very nice write-up of the process was posted previously to this blog.  That being said, it is strongly recommended that clients not have to rely on AIA paths to build certificate chains.  Rather, the new PKI’s hierarchy should be deployed in advance using Group Policy or “certutil -dspublish”. By placing the CA certificates locally on the clients, the administrator can both influence the path clients choose when they encounter cross certification and will ensure that outages of AIA path servers don’t affect a client’s ability to build a chain.

On a similar note, ensure that any new CAs that are issuing end entity certificates are listed in the NTAuthCertificates object.  The process to add them is detailed here and here.

Some applications do not support SHA2.  Before using SHA2 signed certificates with a specific application, it is recommended that all PKI dependent components of that application be tested.  For example, if SHA2 will be used for S/MIME; then every email client, email server, relay, spam filter, security device, etc belonging to both one’s own organization and those of external organizations (which exchange S/MIME messages with one’s organization) would need to be validated that they can process S/MIME with SHA2. For this reason, both old and new PKI hierarchy may need to operate while applications are upgraded/migrated.
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