Want to protect your cyber security and still get fast solutions? Ask a secure question today.Go Premium

x
  • Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 699
  • Last Modified:

Locking down non-domain users /computer

How can I stop non domain joined machines / users  from accessing any files and maybe DNS on an SBS2011 network? (Server 2008 R2)
Considering SBS usually assumes the primary DNS role this would also stop non doamain joined machines from accessing the internet (incliding phones)
Possible?
Any ideas welcome.
Olaf
0
Olaf De Ceuster
Asked:
Olaf De Ceuster
2 Solutions
 
Alan HardistyCo-OwnerCommented:
One way would be to hard-code every domain-joined device on the network and set the DHCP scope to only give out a few IP Addresses which are to things like copiers, but that are reserved addresses, which would basically mean any computer trying to connect and pick up an IP Address would be bang out of luck and wouldn't be able to access the server or the web because they wouldn't have a valid IP Address.

It's not the best / most practical solution on the world, but it would work.
0
 
Olaf De CeusterAuthor Commented:
Hi and thanks  Alan,
Hardcoding is a good idea and easy but how would I stop DHCP from handing out IP's to the other machines? Stop it all together?  How can I then use reservations for printers ect?
And when I need to join a new machine I'd have assing a manual IP?
Thanks
Olaf
0
 
Alan HardistyCo-OwnerCommented:
Don't stop DHCP completely - just reduce the scope to only hand out about 3 addresses (or however many printers you have using DHCP at the moment), then make sure you add a reservation for each printer and then DHCP will only hand out IP's to the printers, but the same one every time and there won't be any DHCP addresses left for anything else.

Yes - when you want to add a new machine, you assign it a new fixed IP Address.

It's a pain to manage - but it would solve the problem.

Alternatively, setup the DHCP scope for the number of computers / devices you have and then reserve an IP Address for each device, so that you have DHCP allocating the same IP to each device and then you don't have to write anything down in Excel.  You just expand your scope as you expand your computer base.  That way you have no spare IP's to allocate to un-reserved devices.

Alan
0
The Lifecycle Approach to Managing Security Policy

Managing application connectivity and security policies can be achieved more effectively when following a framework that automates repeatable processes and ensures that the right activities are performed in the right order.

 
Olaf De CeusterAuthor Commented:
Ok I'll give that a go.
Will let you know after the weekend.
Thanks
Olaf
0
 
Olaf De CeusterAuthor Commented:
Can I do Mac Locking like in routers?
Olaf
0
 
Alan HardistyCo-OwnerCommented:
Yes - you reserve the IP by the MAC address in DHCP.

Shout if you need any help over the weekend.

Alan
0
 
Andy MIT Systems ManagerCommented:
Regarding stopping access to files on the server, change the share permissions for any folder from Everyone to Authenticated Users (or specific users/groups) - this will force anyone accessing the shares to either be on a domain computer or have to type in username and password for a domain account.

As for stopping DNS access. Well, the first port of call is to find out why you have non-domain systems on the network in the first place. Do you mean staff member phones? If so restricting wireless access will probably be a better way to do this - if they can't even join the wireless they can't do anything.

If it's users hard-wiring their own computers I would look into and discuss this with management as surely this must be against some company policy as effectively they are (without permission) changing system configurations and can cause issues with the network. If users are messing about with network cables they can (even accidentally) knock out the entire network by creating network loops or plugging the wrong cable into a port (speaking from experience with clients who have had similar issues in the past).

Limiting DHCP can help in some cases (though I would put printers on static IP's as well and just remove DHCP altogether) though this can cause issues when you need to update settings in the future (have to manually update each computer).  
Still, if someone with a little bit of knowledge wants to get around this all they have to do is add a static address to their non-domain computer and access will be restored for them.
0
 
Giovanni HewardCommented:
Look into deploying the Network Policy and Access Services role, which provides for a type of Network Access Control (NAC), called Network Access Protection (NAP).  The enforcement method you'll want to use (or combined with others) is DHCP enforcement.

See http://technet.microsoft.com/en-US/library/dd125379%28v=ws.10%29.aspx

You could also consider deploying a proxy which requires authentication prior to granting Internet access.
0
 
Gary ColtharpSr. Systems EngineerCommented:
If the foreign devices are wireless, either lock it down by changing the security or setup MAC restrictions.

If the foreign devices are wired, a managed switch would work wonders. Just turn off any ports you are not using. Enable them through the web interface when you need to change your infrastructure.

HTH
Gary
0
 
Olaf De CeusterAuthor Commented:
NPA and MAc locking did the trick.
Thanks heaps.
Olaf
0

Featured Post

Who's Defending Your Organization from Threats?

Protecting against advanced threats requires an IT dream team – a well-oiled machine of people and solutions working together to defend your organization. Download our resource kit today to learn more about the tools you need to build you IT Dream Team!

Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now