Tunneling and SSH and SSL

Why does SSL and SSH require tunneling as part of their protocols

(Sorry for the simple question)
Anthony LuciaAsked:
Who is Participating?
 
Dave HoweSoftware and Hardware EngineerCommented:
Hmm.

SSL *is* a tunnelling protocol, and has no meaning outside of that - nobody uses SSL on its own for anything, but uses it to tunnel another protocol - hence, HTTPS is HTTP over SSL (TLS), SMTPS is SMTP over SSL, LDAPS... ah, you get the idea.

SSH is more complex to answer. part of the protocol definition allows both client and server to support tunnelling - there are ways to disable that, but the protocol defines it and it is commonly implemented.  SSH is itself a replacement for telnet, and in some cases (to cisco devices, for example) that is all that is supported. However, SSH can also do much, much more, including using public keys for authentication (similar to how SSL certificates work), tunnelling, proxying, file transfer - its a feature-rich connectivity option.  But the default feature set is to allow you to get a command prompt on a remote server and use that to issue commands - anything else is a bonus :)
0
 
Dave BaldwinFixer of ProblemsCommented:
Oops.
0
 
Dave HoweSoftware and Hardware EngineerCommented:
oops?
0
 
Dave BaldwinFixer of ProblemsCommented:
I erased my reply cause I like yours better.
0
 
Dave HoweSoftware and Hardware EngineerCommented:
aww, I want to see your reply now :)
0
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

All Courses

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.