Solved

MS ACCESS 2007 syntax on ACCESS:  IIF/Or statement

Posted on 2014-03-27
3
562 Views
Last Modified: 2014-03-28
the following script runs and delivers good results on the pre-"Or" statement.  However, it is ignoring the post-"Or" statement:

TG:
IIf([Do we want to see an increase in this Measure?]=True And [TmsrAmt]![Target]>[Data],[TmsrAmt]![Target],[Data]-([Data]*0.05)
Or
 IIf([Do we want to see an increase in this Measure?]=False And [TmsrAmt]![Target]>[Data],[Data]-([Data]*0.05)))

Assistance please
0
Comment
Question by:willjx
3 Comments
 
LVL 50

Accepted Solution

by:
Rgonzo1971 earned 500 total points
ID: 39961082
Hi,

pls try

IIf([TmsrAmt]![Target]>[Data],IIf([Do we want to see an increase in this Measure?]=True,TmsrAmt]![Target],[Data]-([Data]*0.05)),[Data]-([Data]*0.05))

Open in new window

Regards
0
 
LVL 47

Expert Comment

by:Dale Fye (Access MVP)
ID: 39962157
I'm assuming that this is being used in a query and that:

[Do we want to see an increase in this Measure?]

is actually intended to be an input box or a parameter.  If that is the case, did you declare this parameter as a boolean? If not, you might want to try:

IIf([Do we want to see an increase in this Measure?]="True" And [TmsrAmt]![Target]>[Data],[TmsrAmt]![Target],[Data]-([Data]*0.05)

The IIF() statement in the 2nd part is formatted improperly, it should have three arguments, one that evaluates to True/False and then the value for True, followed by the Value for False.  Yours only has 2 arguments.
0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:willjx
ID: 39962763
After I added a [ after the 1st "True",    (=True,  [TmsrAmt] !)
this solution worked beautifully.
--matched perfectly with results my user provided in Excel.
Thanks.
0

Featured Post

Announcing the Most Valuable Experts of 2016

MVEs are more concerned with the satisfaction of those they help than with the considerable points they can earn. They are the types of people you feel privileged to call colleagues. Join us in honoring this amazing group of Experts.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Today companies are subjected to more-and-more data, and it won't stop any time soon.  But there are obvious opportunities for reducing data, particularly data duplicated among companies.
This article will guide you to convert a grid from a picture into Excel format using Microsoft OneNote and no other 3rd party application.
The viewer will learn how to simulate a series of coin tosses with the rand() function and learn how to make these “tosses” depend on a predetermined probability. Flipping Coins in Excel: Enter =RAND() into cell A2: Recalculate the random variable…
The viewer will learn how to simulate a series of sales calls dependent on a single skill level and learn how to simulate a series of sales calls dependent on two skill levels. Simulating Independent Sales Calls: Enter .75 into cell C2 – “skill leve…

830 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question