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Paging file in SBS2011

C drive usageVirtual MemoryHi,
  I have a server box with 24GB of RAM. In it, I have SBS2011 in a 200GB partition.
  Currently about 80GB is free and pagefile.sys size is 36GB.
  Is it necessary to keep the paging file size that big?
  Can I reduce it? If I do, what am I going to loose or what are the dangers of reducing it?

Thanks.
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sglee
Asked:
sglee
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6 Solutions
 
pgm554Commented:
No.

You ,but can easily move it somewhere else with more space.

I rarely go above 8gb.
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0xSaPx0Commented:
No need to have a paging file unless you may run out of available system memory. If you do not have a page file and exceed the available memory your server may crash.

With that much free space I'd suggest a 4-8gb page file.
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sgleeAuthor Commented:
OK. The consensus seem to be 8GB. Once I change it to 8GB, should I reboot the server?
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0xSaPx0Commented:
Won't take effect until you reboot, so you will need to at some point.
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David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerCommented:
If you can put the paging file on a seperate spindle (drive)
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
You should always have a paging file as large as physical memory. There is internal processing that uses this, most notably if a server blue screens, that makes this true in most cases.

Personally, since XP, windows has been very good at knowing what size the paging file should be for the best balance of performance and I don't recommend monkeying with it. Moving it to another hard drive for space or better I/O is the *most* I recommend for all but the most advanced configurations.
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0xSaPx0Commented:
@Cliff

While you are technically correct, very few people ever use anything other than a mini-dump these days. If it comes down to  specific issue where he needs to have a full dump he can increase the page file.

Until then I'd stick with the 8gb, no sense cordoning off 24gb of a drive just for a file that is never going to be used.
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sgleeAuthor Commented:
If keeping the size of paging file as big as physical memory size for the purpose of memory dump, in my experience with PCs, does not make a whole a lot of sense.
I have never been able to utilize memory dump to troubleshoot "BSOD" problem.
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
Except hat when windows crashes, it uses all of that to verify NTFS. When you reduce tearing file size, you basically guarantee that any crash (and some patch related reboots) now require a file system integrity scan, significantly increasing  maintenance windows. And in the case of a BSOD, potentially unrecoverable journal errors become a real possibility, making backup restorations, repair installations, or even full OS rebuilds more likely.

Disk space is cheap. If you avoid even one incident by running a largesse file, it has paid for itself.
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Gary ColtharpSr. Systems EngineerCommented:
Agree with Cliff here. Especially with SBS. Between databases, exchange, etc.... SBS will use all the memory you give it. The paging space should be "System Managed Size" or manually set to approximate physical memory. You can relocate it to a partition other than C: but make sure it is on fault tolerant, high speed storage. Ideally only do this if it is a separate partition on the same RAID volume.

HTH
Gary
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