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SQL 2012 NT_Authority|System, sysadmin is not checked by default

I have an application from a 3rd party that requires a different setting on my SQL 2012.  I'm not real familiar with MS SQL, but can follow instructions through the Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio and I have a couple of databases already setup and working.  The vendor for the application is stating the following (see below), but I'm not real sure what needs to be done.  Can someone give me the steps necessary to get this configured correctly?  

Here is what they are telling me:

The service runs under the Local System (NT AUTHORITY\System) account. In SQL 2012 this Local System (NT AUTHORITY\SYSTEM) account is not automatically provisioned in the sysadmin fixed server role.
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ontheborder
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ontheborder
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5 Solutions
 
Brian CroweDatabase AdministratorCommented:
Within SSMS open Security under the database in question.  Double-click on the "NT AUTHORITY\SYSTEM" user.  Select "Server Roles".  Check "sysadmin"

Done
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Kyle AbrahamsSenior .Net DeveloperCommented:
What they want you to do is grant SA to the local system account.  I would push back on that.  The most that I would ever grant to a third party is DBO on their own database.

Ask them if the service can run under another application account (eg: 3rdPartyService), and if DBO is sufficient for their purposes on their database(s).
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Scott PletcherSenior DBACommented:
I agree with Kyle.  Indeed, I'd be concerned that their app seems to have admin authority on the server itself.

I suspect they don't need sysadmin.  They might need dbcreator (at least until their db(s) are created), and a few specific other roles/permissions, but they should not need sysadmin.

Make it clear to your management that if they give sysadmin to the app, you cannot guarantee performance for the instance.
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ontheborderAuthor Commented:
The 3rd party is a trusted vendor and we have security agreements with them, so it should be okay to allow this type of access.  

BriCrowe - I believe you're on track.   When I check the Database > XXXX > Security    I don't see "NT AUTHORITY\SYSTEM" as an option.   I opened both the Users folder and the Roles folder, and don't see it listed as an option.
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Brian CroweDatabase AdministratorCommented:
It may be that 2012 doesn't even add the user.  In that case you need to add the login as you would any other user either via the UI or by script.

CREATE LOGIN [NT AUTHORITY\SYSTEM] FROM WINDOWS;
GO

Open in new window

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ontheborderAuthor Commented:
Thanks, BriCrowe.  From what I can tell the NT AUTHORITY\SYSTEM account isn't installed automatically on MS SQL 2012.  I'll give your suggestion a try later today and see if that works.
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ontheborderAuthor Commented:
After executing

CREATE LOGIN [NT AUTHORITY\SYSTEM] FROM WINDOWS;


I received the following message.

The server principal 'NT AUTHORITY\SYSTEM' already exists.
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Kyle AbrahamsSenior .Net DeveloperCommented:
you have to look at logins on the server level, NOT the database level.

I would recommend NOT giving sa role to this account as the 3rd party will have access to do whatever they want on that server.  (Including seeing data to other DBs you have in there).  If that's the only thing on that server than by all means go ahead.
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ontheborderAuthor Commented:
After further review we've decided that due to questions about security, we are not going to pursue this configuration change.  I haven't been able to get assurance from the vendor that this wouldn't compromise our security.  We didn't attempt to provisioned the sysadmin as a fixed server role any further.  Unless someone has any other information and feels like this is safe, we're going to move to a completely different option that the vendor is offering through their application.
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Kyle AbrahamsSenior .Net DeveloperCommented:
granting SA is giving the keys to the kingdom for the database server in question.

If the vendor has another option I would go with it.
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ontheborderAuthor Commented:
Thanks.  All answers were helpful.  Moving to a less risky "Plan B".
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