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is sql database location as important now when using virtual servers and smart san arrays

is it still important to locate tempdb data files log files etc all on seperate drives?
when using a virtual server with smart arrays like emc vnx5600 etc
as the lun is treated as one big disk
and emc smart array moved data to faster disks anyone
does it really matter anymore
4 Solutions
Carl TawnSystems and Integration DeveloperCommented:
If you are dumping all of your data onto a SAN then no, not really, from a performance perspective at least. Even when using a SAN though I would still tend to split the database across LUNs for manageability more than anything.
Steve MCommented:
Not really no - the only reason I would think on a SAN is if you have LUN sizing that is a bit restrictive, in that case you'll want to separate them so logs don't fill up your DB LUN, and also temp DB can grow quite large with heavy transactions during application upgrades etc, so sometimes it will need lots of temp room to grow.  Performance wise though, no difference.
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
If all your LUNs are cut from the same spindles (SAN), performance will be the same.
Scott PletcherSenior DBACommented:
Not nearly as critical to performance anymore.

But, I think even then you can still do two (or more, if you wanted) separate raid sets.  And I strongly recommend that for SQL Server, for at least two reasons:

1) Recoverability -- critical.  For any given db, if the logs are on a different raid set than the data, you have full recoverability at all times (unless, of course, both raid sets fail at the same time, which is statistically virtually impossible).

2) Performance -- RAID 10 generally works better for log files, which are 90+% write.  RAID 5/6 generally works better for data.
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