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Script - VB or Powershell to Check Services and Uptime

Posted on 2014-04-04
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Last Modified: 2014-05-14
Hi,

Can someone share some handy powershell or vb script to run on either server 2003 and 2008 to check if all services set to automatic are running and its uptime and dump the results to a text file.

Thanks!!!
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Question by:syseng007
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8 Comments
 
LVL 35

Accepted Solution

by:
Dan Craciun earned 500 total points
ID: 39978084
Test if this works on PS2:
Get-CimInstance win32_service -Filter "startmode = 'auto' AND state != 'running'" -ComputerName computername | export-csv report.csv

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HTH,
Dan
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LVL 67

Expert Comment

by:sirbounty
ID: 39978151
Uptime can be found via

$wmi = Get-WmiObject -Class Win32_OperatingSystem
$wmi.LocalDateTime - $wmi.LastBootUpTime
0
 
LVL 29

Expert Comment

by:becraig
ID: 39978540
Something like this should work:

$Results = @()
gc serverlist.txt | % {
$computer = $_
$lastboottime = (Get-WmiObject -Class Win32_OperatingSystem -computername $computer).LastBootUpTime
$sysuptime = (Get-Date) – [System.Management.ManagementDateTimeconverter]::ToDateTime($lastboottime) 
$uptimer = $sysuptime.days "days" $sysuptime.hours "hours" $sysuptime.minutes "minutes" $sysuptime.seconds "seconds" 
$slist = gwmi Win32_Service-computername $computer | where {$_.StartMode -ne "Auto"} | select Name
$results += $computer $uptimer $slist

}
$Results | out-file reportfile.csv

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LVL 35

Expert Comment

by:Dan Craciun
ID: 39978560
@becraig: looks good, but the requirement was services with automatic startup that are running.

So something like (untested):
$slist = gwmi Win32_Service -computername $computer | where {$_.StartMode -eq "Auto" -and $_.State -eq "Running"} | select Name

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LVL 29

Expert Comment

by:becraig
ID: 39978649
Thanks Dan, update:

$Results = @()
$Results += 
@"
Server, Service, StartMode, State, Uptime
"@
gc serverlist.txt | % {
$computer = $_
$lastboottime = (Get-WmiObject -Class Win32_OperatingSystem -computername $computer).LastBootUpTime
$sysuptime = (Get-Date) – [System.Management.ManagementDateTimeconverter]::ToDateTime($lastboottime) 
$uptimer = $sysuptime.days "days" $sysuptime.hours "hours" $sysuptime.minutes "minutes" $sysuptime.seconds "seconds" 
$slist = gwmi Win32_Service-computername $computer
$slist | % {
$svcmode = $_.StartMode; $svcname = $_.Name; $svcstate = $_.State 
$Results += "$computer, $svcname, $svcstate, $svcmode, $uptimer"
}
}
$Results | out-file reportfile.csv

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0
 
LVL 35

Expert Comment

by:Dan Craciun
ID: 39978818
@becraig: tried it and it threw an error on line 10. Had to rewrite it like this:
$uptimer = "$($sysuptime.days) days, $($sysuptime.hours) hours, $($sysuptime.minutes) minutes, $($sysuptime.seconds) seconds"

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0
 
LVL 29

Expert Comment

by:becraig
ID: 39978912
Ok fixed it:


$Results = @()
$Results += 
@"
Server`tService`tState`tStartMode`tLastBoot
"@
gc serverlist.txt | % {
$computer = $_
$LastBoot = (Get-WmiObject -Class Win32_OperatingSystem -computername $computer) | %{$_.ConverttoDateTime($_.LastBootUpTime)}

$slist = gwmi Win32_Service -computername $computer
$slist | % {
$svcmode = $_.StartMode; $svcname = $_.Name; $svcstate = $_.State 
$Results += "$computer`t$svcname`t$svcstate`t$svcmode`t$Lastboot"
}
}
$Results | out-file reportfile.csv

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0
 
LVL 29

Expert Comment

by:becraig
ID: 40013756
Did this provide the desired result ?

Or do you need any additional help with this.
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