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Linux command structure / syntax to copy Windows/7 backups I found on USB drive

Posted on 2014-04-05
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Can you please help me create the correct request / syntax using either Knoppix Live or UB CD to access  my problem Windows 7 PC.   I'm trying to restore newly installed Windows 7 which now fails to boot, and found my 4/1 backups and windows image backup files on my USB drive.  Ccan copy via the correct I was trying to use any Live interface Knoppix or UBCD to copy the backups I found on one USB drive from 4/1 along with the backup windows image, but not having any luck.  Can you help with this?  I found the following, but still a tad confused.  
The backups are on sdd1 which is on an external USB harddrive, and I'd like to copy them to another usb HD of greater size in the hopes I can use them to restore.

The copy sample for Linux I found follows
Type "mount" and see if /mnt/sda1 is (ro) for read-only or (rw) for read-write.  If (ro) then try "mount -o remount -w /mnt/sda1" to re-mount it as read-write.
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Question by:Asta Cu
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by:Dan Craciun
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Don't restore with Linux.

Boot with the Windows DVD, go to repair then select "Restore using previously created system image" then point to the USB drive.

HTH,
Dan
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by:Asta Cu
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Trying to restore computer from the system image again.  Large, will take hours.  Will report back when more is known.  

I failed to remove the old E drive with the old Vista windows directory before doing this and hope that doesn't kill things.  Drat.
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by:Asta Cu
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After reboot, Windows Boot Manager screen
Windows has encountered a problem communicating with a device connected to your computer such as faulty hardware, HD, CDROM that is failing, etc.  status 0xc00000e9
info:  An unexpected I/O error has occurred.
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by:skullnobrains
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answering your original question

assuming that sdd1 is mounted and the disk image is available on /path/to/image

sudo dd if=/path/to/image of=/dev/sda

will copy the image to the first sata disk

if it is not a full disk image or you have several disks, you can use things like /dev/sdc2 to copy to the second partition of the third disk

---

note that if you put your seven image on a usb drive, it won't boot unless it was previously hacked to load the usb drivers before mounting the disks. this may be the cause of your error
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by:Asta Cu
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Thank you; everything failed again.  Will return to troubleshoot this in the vening.
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by:serialband
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It sounds like a failing disk or bad sector may have caused your initial problem.  If your disk is remotely salvageable, and you still want to retrieve the data, get a new disk and install a new copy of Windows.

Then install Roadkil's Unstoppable Copier.  http://www.roadkil.net/program.php?ProgramID=29

Then Use Roadkil's Unstoppable Copier on the failing disk.  This will read data off all all working sectors, if the drive can still start.  You won't get anything off the bad sectors, so any data there is just lost.  You should be able to get most of your data from the drive before it gets worse.
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by:Asta Cu
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Thank you for the information.  I'll get back to this system this evening, late and report progress.  What I don't get is that this was a brand new Western Digital 1.5 TB internal drive, just installed and run less than 60 hours.
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by:skullnobrains
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you cannot determine that a drive is dead that easily. if you don't want it, i'll definitely find a use for it.

the minimal requirement for determining that a drive is dead would be something like
- disk not starting / not recognized at all
- not being able to format it because of defective clusters
- smart attributes showing that all spare clusters are used or showing exponential growth of the number of dead sectors
- smart attributes showing tons of CRC errors
- use of a filesystem with builtin checksums showing frequent data degradation
- filesystem breaking repetitively while being 100% sure this is not due to an external cause (i would hardly rely on that one)

if you have a live cd around, checking smart attributes and attempt to mount and/or format the drive should be easy (use smartctl and gparted for example)

maybe you should post better details regarding how this mess started initially. if you just installed the os, you may consider reinstallation rather than restoring a backup

if you still want a new drive, consider hitachi. from my experience, nothing compares to them in terms of robustness, and they compete with the best performance-wise
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did you notice what i said regarding usb ?

there is no way you can boot windows seven from an usb drive if you restored an install originally performed on an internal drive. at best you might get lucky enough to have it start the boot sequence using bios floppy emulation and crash once the disk driver is loaded
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by:Asta Cu
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Thanks, much to try.

The fiasco began suddenly with a Blue Screen of Death about 2 weeks ago and repair did not work, showed that Seagate drive had problems.  That 750 Seagate drive contained all my backup and windows image files along with Windows 7; installed a new WD 1.5 TB drive and the old one with bad sectors formatted it to keep more than 500GB of storage space in an external USB case.  

1.  Installed new 1.5 TB WD drive on which new Windows 7 was installed since prior attempts to recover failed.  At first boot was surprised to see a boot option screen on reboot showing three options  * Load previous OS  * Windows 7  * Vista.  This was surprising since Vista was on another E Drive inside and not used since first upgraded to W/7.  Chose Windows 7.  Everything worked fine for about 2 days.

2.  Had nearly 200 WindowsUpdates needed, one of which was Service Patch 1 and other critical updates.  All said they installed successfully.

3.  Rebooted, still had the boot option screen but OK, since things worked after installing many of my needed applications, Adobe, McAfee, etc.

4.  During online activity, suddenly again the old BSOD from which I could not recover and all the stuff posted before applies.

Was advise to remove all but the one drive on which I'm planning to install Windows 7 again, which I'd love to avoid.  2 IBM Scsi disks, 2 other WD disks and the new WD 1.5 tb SATA drive. and a Blue Ray DVD/CD drive.

Many of the LIVE analyses I've read in logs, etc. find 3 WD drives but don't all find the SCSI drives.  

And the craziness that Windows in all its other error reports is pointing to my E vs. C drive as the one which should contain the restore files.  

I hasten to add that using the Knoppix Live DVD and File Manager lets me view content on all drives, which leads me to believe that the drives are OK.  Maybe I can get to an elevated DOS prompt to run chkdsk /f or scandisk if that can help. ????

HelP
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by:skullnobrains
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This was surprising since Vista was on another E Drive inside and not used since first upgraded to W/7

as far as i understand, you made a fresh install. at that time. the windows installer detected the vista installation regardless the fact it was not on the first drive.

this detection probably occurred because at the time the installer was launched, vista was on the first active partition (since the wd was probably not partitioned or formatted). alternatively, the windows installer may have progressed in existing OS detection since i last checked.

McAfee

unrelated but yiiiks. this is heavier and has detection rates much worse than most freeware AV

During online activity, suddenly again the old BSOD from which I could not recover and all the stuff posted before applies.

this can indicate one of 3 hardware-related things (at least)
- dead drive. given the circumstances, this is unlikely
- dying disk controller. not very likely either : it would not produce such a repetitive setup
- dead memory. does not seem very likely given the history but you can easily check that one

more likely, windows cannot properly figure heads and tails of your complex disk setup. maybe it got mixed by vista and somehow you performed an upgrade of vista on a different disk. maybe the drive detection order changes and windows gets mixed up (that one is quite realistic). maybe you have another software issue such as a virus, or an antivirus could produce by toying with the disk driver (much less realistic)

Was advise to remove all but the one drive on which I'm planning to install Windows 7 again, which I'd love to avoid

this is good advise because you may be working on a weird setup in which the boot loader is on your e drive while the os is on the c. you can always plug other disks afterwards.

before that i'd go for starting the machine with just the new drive and see what happens. you'll definitely get useful debug information.

Many of the LIVE analyses I've read in logs, etc. find 3 WD drives but don't all find the SCSI drives.  

whate are LIVE analysis ? antivirus ?

I hasten to add that using the Knoppix Live DVD and File Manager lets me view content on all drives, which leads me to believe that the drives are OK.  Maybe I can get to an elevated DOS prompt to run chkdsk /f or scandisk if that can help. ????

you can but you'll most likely be loosing time. the disk is fine and btw it is not all that unlikely that the previous was fine as well.

btw i do not think scandisk still exists (I thought it disapeared since NT and has no real equivalent, but should be present in many dos cds. the knoppix live cd has a small dos/freedos included that probably has it)

if knoppix sees the drives, and can read and write from them, they are likely fine. you can write a big file with dd and check for errors in dmesg. if the disk has problems you'll likely see tons of dma and/or "bad sector" stuff. formatting using ntfs (not the quick format) is also a good way to check for bad sectors, but will destroy the data.

---

you should start debugging by removing drives :

if you have a hardware issue, it is probably unrelated to that drive. possibly a mess with the SCSI controller working erratically.

if you have a software issue, it is either a mess with a driver that gets corrupt, and/or a mess related with a weird installation with the boot loader on the wrong drive, possibly mixed with a race condition that makes the drive detection order inconsistent

either way, unplug drives and post results
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by:Asta Cu
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Bummer, spent the last half hour typing details to respond, and lost it when I erred on the tags, saved this and the information is gone.  I'll recreate shortly.  Your assessments so far are right on spot!  I did find that the E partition of one WD drive (partitioned as E and F, E carried the old Vista OS) has, among others these folders
System Volume Information
NTdetect.com
msdos.sys
Ntdlr
Boot  and other such folders DO exist on the E drive.  PLUS the E drive has two logical letters/partitioned as E and F.  The short test on the F partition had onlySystem Volume Information folder in which is tracking.log, same for the other WD drive, whereas the partition which is E, the old Vista drive has

Wonder if I were to remove only that WD drive and try to repair again if it would work to save my recent installations.  What do you think?  Hope?

I'll return to this system later today and do more of what has been recommended and check back for any updates.  I sure appreciate your expertise.

This process has been arduous and I had 2 other Qs around the BSOD issue (both of them), if the links would help.  

":0)  Asta
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by:Asta Cu
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You said... his detection probably occurred because at the time the installer was launched, vista was on the first active partition (since the wd was probably not partitioned or formatted). alternatively, the windows installer may have progressed in existing OS detection since i last checked.
I AGREE that is what happened, and something in all my recovery efforts corrupted all kinds of boot files that are required.  There appears to be a lot of inconsistency in the various tools used and reports found (logs)

Using either Knoppix Adriane Live or UBCD tools to analyse the drives and content has worked for all the drives, but the content seems to vary, depending on what tools I use.  For one of the partitions on the WD drive where E and F reside (E partition had Vista, F partition data files)... the F drive only shows System Volume Information, as is true for the other smaller WD drive, both of which had more content and only show the System Volume Information.  There are 3 internal WD drives, the main new one with W7 which is 1.5 GV, one is the WD2500, data stuff and the other WD1200 has the old Vista and the two partitions above.

The logs I found (working from memory) included the windowsupdate.log, which showed successful W7 SP1 and critical updates that took place on 4/2; and about 5 others, one of which had to do with boot.

Other anomoly, when using the UBCD and the SeaTools to scan disks, it only showed the WD main W/7 1.5 TB drive..C drive and the two internal WD drives, none of the sCSI drives.

When you mentioned NTFS, I recall that on one of the many Startup Repair processes for Windows 7, the following were found to be root causes of boot failure and it was mfewfpk.sys reported as corrupt and repair action failed - error code = 0x2, and system restore also failed error 0x1f after an all night run and also states that ntfs.sys file corrupt but that Repair did fix this one.  I tried 3 of 4 available restore points (3 oldest).  After failed repair or restore processes, this rings a bell.   'BOOTMGR is missing. Press Ctrl + Alt + Delete to restart' yet after doing this I kept getting the same screen.  This was a repeating problem  


How would I do this which you recommend?  you can write a big file with dd and check for errors in dmesg  Should I try this on all the internal drives before removing them to test?

Also when you said  if you have a hardware issue, it is probably unrelated to that drive. possibly a mess with the SCSI controller working erratically.  Since the strange behavior on one of the last week's processes after the Windows 7 new installation there were driver detection problems for the Adaptec driver for the IBM SCSI drives, that could be a source.  But would that be likely to stop me from being able to boot Windows with all these errors and BSOD results?

And YES, thank you also for that; I understand I cannot boot from the USB drive.

I'll try updating and copying the Driver files, especially for the Adaptec Ultra 160 drivers.
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by:Asta Cu
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First Q and first BSOD provides more history to help expedite matters.  This nightmare began the end of March and I've been working it ever since.  Thanks for all the help to try and save all possible.

http://www.experts-exchange.com/OS/Microsoft_Operating_Systems/Windows/Windows_7/Q_28400512.html
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by:skullnobrains
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Wonder if I were to remove only that WD drive and try to repair again if it would work to save my recent installations.  What do you think?  Hope?

possibly, but first start to boot with ONLY the new drive, and post debug info, then repair or reinstall, then plug other drives.

the fact that there is a boot manager on the second drive does not mean that there is none on the first. the above test will help clear the mess.

something in all my recovery efforts corrupted all kinds of boot files that are required

from my experience, recovery is hardly ever a good idea. better repair manually when you can and reinstall when you can't. most OSes ony provide manual recovery, or automate only very specific tasks and tell you what they do along the way. there is a good reason for that.

the only fully recoverable seven is a virtual one : VM snapshots do work as expected.

Using either Knoppix Adriane Live or UBCD tools to analyse the drives and content has worked for all the drives, but the content seems to vary, depending on what tools I use.  For one of the partitions on the WD drive where E and F reside (E partition had Vista, F partition data files)... the F drive only shows System Volume Information, as is true for the other smaller WD drive, both of which had more content and only show the System Volume Information.  There are 3 internal WD drives, the main new one with W7 which is 1.5 GV, one is the WD2500, data stuff and the other WD1200 has the old Vista and the two partitions above.

filesystems may be corrupted, maybe you mounted the drive as root and looked at the file as a regular user, lots of possibilities. i do not see what is different between a tool and the other in the above.

anyway, let's focus on the new drive for now

Other anomoly, when using the UBCD and the SeaTools to scan disks, it only showed the WD main W/7 1.5 TB drive..C drive and the two internal WD drives, none of the sCSI drives.

don't bother and forget what i stated above regarding scsi. that tool probably just does not have the scsi controller driver.

When you mentioned NTFS, I recall that on one of the many Startup Repair processes for Windows 7, the following were found to be root causes of boot failure and it was mfewfpk.sys reported as corrupt and repair action failed - error code = 0x2, and system restore also failed error 0x1f after an all night run and also states that ntfs.sys file corrupt but that Repair did fix this one.

looks like a system driver modified by macaffee that windows tried to restore to the windows version and... your system is already dead at that point.

How would I do this which you recommend?  you can write a big file with dd and check for errors in dmesg  Should I try this on all the internal drives before removing them to test?

no : that test is irrelevant now : your problem is definitively not a dead drive.

you should only plug the new drive, and boot, if you can't, boot in safe mode, if you still can't, reinstall (or possibly use the repair operation from the windows cd).

start there, tell me what happens and we'll devise a best course of action.

toying with repair tools and doing complex test is only bound to be time-consuming.

Also when you said  if you have a hardware issue, it is probably unrelated to that drive. possibly a mess with the SCSI controller working erratically.  Since the strange behavior on one of the last week's processes after the Windows 7 new installation there were driver detection problems for the Adaptec driver for the IBM SCSI drives, that could be a source.  But would that be likely to stop me from being able to boot Windows with all these errors and BSOD results?

hardware issue : i was wrong

driver issue causing BSOD : yes it is possible. next time it happens, try to unplug the drives, or boot in debug mode to make sure this is the cause of your problem.

And YES, thank you also for that; I understand I cannot boot from the USB drive.

actually it is possible with a registry hack to instruct the windows kernel to load USB drivers before it loads the disk drivers. (before that point, it uses bios calls to access the drive).

I'll try updating and copying the Driver files, especially for the Adaptec Ultra 160 drivers.

refer to what i said above : this is a loss of time : remove the SCSI card, get your system to work, then install adapted drivers the normal way, then plug the scsi card.

First Q

nothing interesting there, your cd image was corrupt ( i only read up to the link to the next question)

next question : looks like a corrupt disk sector or bad memory block at that time, possibly corrupt disk driver (maybe caused by mcaffee)... not enough information on the thread to be sure.
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by:Asta Cu
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Yesterday I found at the Asus site for my P6T Deluxe MB many BIOS updates, some of which were related to disk detection and support of new CPUs.  My BIOS is older than everything shown here for my Model... I have version 0504 of 7/14/2009, current is P6T SE 0908 BIOS
 .  http://support.asus.com/Download.aspx?SLanguage=en&m=P6T+SE&os=

BIOS UPDATE SUCCESSFUL.  This rules out bios causes and outdated MB drivers for w7
Now disconnecting drives and scsi card

At boot, new drive loads with api interface shows as sata and SMART good.  That and the DVD drive the only devices there and found.  At boot, the Windows Boot Manager screen says windows problems I/O error and 0xc00000e9.  Saw this before on attempts to recover backup image file, I think.  Could not use 4/3 restore point.


Reloaded with Windows 7 disk and running startup repair.  Thank you for the excellent information, much to do this morning with your guidance.  Will report back.
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by:Asta Cu
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Startup repair is now running again and will run for a long time if it repeats last effort with all drives in.

The same error noted a few hours ago with only the new drive with W7 installed was first reported and resolved in this Q back on March 24, and now back again with even just one drive running and is the old Windows Boot Manager screen following new repair this morning error 0xc00000e9... unexpected I/O error.  

http://www.experts-exchange.com/OS/Microsoft_Operating_Systems/Windows/Windows_7/Q_28396404.html
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bios is not relevant : you would not get to this point if the bios did not detect your drives. you have a problem when windows switches from bios int13h to it's own drivers

good luck dwith what comes next. please post back results.

note : i still think a reinstall would be much less time consuming and more sure to work even if you have to perform a crazy number of updates.
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by:Asta Cu
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Forced the start up repair to stop, now installing windows 7 all over again.  Valient efforts, but I sure do give up.  Too  much time spent one and all, but hope this works before I place the drives back in one at a time after doing a successful new install, all updates and so on.

OOOOOPS.... Reinstall process on new drive at a reboot in the process said NTSF CHKDSK running to correct many errors in index $I30 many; then chkdsk is running through tons of RECOVERING Orphaned files.  Gads, hope it's good stuff and chkdsk is able to recover the corrupted items and fix the corrupted file system.

Reinstall process on new drive at a reboot in the process said NTSF CHKDSK running to correct many errors in index $I30 many; then chkdsk is running through tons of RECOVERING Orphaned files.  Gads, hope it's good stuff and chkdsk is able to recover the corrupted items and fix the corrupted file system.

Then at reboot in the process after chkdsk finished, had option screen to choose either

Windows 7
or
Windows 7 (recovered)

Before I could choose, Windows 7 was chosen automatically and installation is progressing.  I've never seen this option screen before.  I'll continue updates on the Windows 7 question.


I think that SATA 3 is the new drive, SATA 1 is DVD and SATA 2 is empty


I'm closing this with THANK YOU SO MUCH since the initial subject you handled in style.

Thank you again,
Asta
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by:skullnobrains
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Reinstall process on new drive at a reboot in the process said NTSF CHKDSK running to correct many errors in index $I30 many; then chkdsk is running through tons of RECOVERING Orphaned files.  Gads, hope it's good stuff and chkdsk is able to recover the corrupted items and fix the corrupted file system.

thanks but that was not all that helpful, since i only actually helped you to forget about that old setup

note that a "clean" install means format that drive instead of correcting ntfs errors. and disable the "quick format" option so if there are bad sectors, you'll have a reasonable chance to know. any other course of action will clearly produce chances to import messy stuff from the old setup to the new one.
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Thanks again for all the help, learned a lot along the way.

Drive was replaced, faulty and fresh install of W/7 was smooth as silk.  Restored so much.

Happy,

":0)  Asta
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