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C++ function pointer initialisation

I am having trouble initialising a function pointer using Boland C++ builder.

A sample of code is given below. I can declare a function pointer but my attempts to code its initialisation have not succeeded.

HEADER File:

typedef class C1
{
    public:
    C1();
    void test(char);

}C1;

typedef void(C1::*fnptr)(char);

//---------------------------------------------------------------------------
class TForm1 : public TForm
{
__published:      // IDE-managed Components
private:      // User declarations
    fnptr fp;  // I haven't used this yet
    C1 *aclass;
public:            // User declarations
    __fastcall TForm1(TComponent* Owner);
};

CPP FILE:

#include <vcl.h>
#pragma hdrstop

#include "Unit1.h"
//---------------------------------------------------------------------------
#pragma package(smart_init)
#pragma resource "*.dfm"
TForm1 *Form1;

C1::C1()
{

}
void C1::test(char x)
{

}

//---------------------------------------------------------------------------
__fastcall TForm1::TForm1(TComponent* Owner)
    : TForm(Owner)
{
    myclass = new C1();
    void (C1::*p)(char); // declare a pointer to a C1::test(char) function

    p = ?? // how do I code the address of the myclass->test(char) function

}
//---------------------------------------------------------------------------
0
Roger Alcindor
Asked:
Roger Alcindor
  • 2
1 Solution
 
Roger AlcindorAuthor Commented:
Correction in the definition of TForm1 class

class TForm1 : public TForm
{
__published:      // IDE-managed Components
private:      // User declarations
    fnptr fp;  // I haven't used this yet
    C1 *myclass;  //     <----  this is the correction
public:            // User declarations
    __fastcall TForm1(TComponent* Owner);
};
0
 
jkrCommented:
There is a little misconception: The function pointer you are using is not 'myclass->test(()', but 'C1::test()' which is later bound to an instance of C2 when you call it. That would thenbe like

  void (C1::*p)(char); // declare a pointer to a C1::test(char) function

    p = C1::test;

Open in new window


You would later use that pointer like

  void (C1::*p)(char); // declare a pointer to a C1::test(char) function

    p = C1::test;

    // ...

    C1 c1;

    (c1.*p)('a');

Open in new window


See also http://www.newty.de/fpt/index.html ("The Function Pointer Tutorials")
0
 
Roger AlcindorAuthor Commented:
Thanks for your excellent solution.
0
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