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DO you think there is a big difference between 24 GB and 240GB SSD drive in PC ?

Posted on 2014-04-08
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Last Modified: 2014-04-13
Hi Do you think there is a big difference of speed between 24 GB and 240GB SSD drive in PC ? What I meant is its speed. Thank you !
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Question by:EESky
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by:Schuyler Dorsey
ID: 39987783
It really depends on the specific drives. You could find easily find one of either that is faster than the other. All SSD drives have different speed ratings.. then you have difference of reliability in SLC vs MLC.
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by:David Johnson, CD, MVP
ID: 39987803
There is no difference except the size of the SSD.. The smaller drive may have older firmware.  For a definitive answer you need to specify the make and model as different manufacturers use different technologies.. Are both drives SLC or MLC ?

There is NO seek time in SSD's compared to spinning disks.
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by:garycase
garycase earned 200 total points
ID: 39987842
There is absolutely a difference based on the size.   Due to the structure of the SSDs, larger units of the same technology will be significantly faster.

For example, I've got several Crucial M500's -- a 120GB, 240GB, and 480GB ... all purchased within the same month.    The 480GB unit clearly works faster than the 240GB unit; which is clearly faster than the 120GB unit.    I've got several Intel 335 units, which show the same results.

It's true that if you're comparing different units, then there are other considerations that also come into play -- e.g. MLC vs SLC; SATA vs SATA-II vs SATA-III; etc.    But in general, you'll absolutely get better performance with larger drives.

By the way, there IS the equivalent of "seek time" with SSD's => NAND chips take a few uSec to stabilize addressing before data transfers can occur.    This is not, of course, an actual "seek", but it does take some time ... typically well under 0.1mSec (typically 25-60 uSec) ... so it's a LOT faster than a traditional drive (less than 1% of a rotating drive's access time).
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by:Schuyler Dorsey
Schuyler Dorsey earned 100 total points
ID: 39987844
In your case, the bigger units are often faster due to the controllers used with the higher models. This is not the case with ALL SSDs.

Intel and Samsung use the same strategy - better controller for more storage.. as they have to.
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garycase earned 200 total points
ID: 39988057
Not true.   ALL manufacturers drives will exhibit the same performance differences -- especially on writes.    The Intel & Crucial drives I noted use the SAME controller in all of the different capacities (for the same model # -- clearly they vary with different models).    The reason higher capacity drives perform better is simple:  the array width is wider, so there's more parallel activity when you're accessing the drives.    Since writes are more complex than reads on SSDs, the performance difference is more noticeable with writes -- look at ANY manufacturer's drives and you'll see the same results.

For example, I just took a look on Newegg's site and randomly picked an additional maker's drives -- the Samsung 840 Pro MZ series drives.    The 128GB version shows 530MB/s reads, 390MB/s writes;  the 512GB version shows 540MB/s reads, 520MB/s writes.    The NUMBER of reads/writes (i.e. IOPS) doesn't vary, since that doesn't depend on the parallelism; but the SPEED of those transfers (especially writes) is definitely improved by the larger units with more parallel cells.

Again, that's true for ANY drive.    One more example:  The OCZ Vertex 450 series shows read speeds of 290MB/s for the 128GB unit, 525MB/s for the 256GB unit, and 530MB/s for the 512GB unit.    Clearly the parallelism increases a good bit from 128GB to 256GB, but likely doesn't change as you move to the 512GB unit.   The same is true for many others -- big differences moving from 60 or 80GB to 128 and then to 256, with very little difference at higher capacities.

But to focus on the question, there would be a VERY large difference between a 24GB and a 240GB drive -- no matter who the manufacturer.
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by:nobus
nobus earned 100 total points
ID: 39988066
it can even be the 24 Gb is a Cache drive for the system
the older ones were in some cases even slower than a rotating disk
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Assisted Solution

by:Ociris4160
Ociris4160 earned 100 total points
ID: 39989674
If you are looking for speed, this site may help. The site shows the benchmarks for all different kinds of hardware including SSD's. I use it when ever I am looking to upgrade and want to get the best performance for my money.

http://www.harddrivebenchmark.net/
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Author Closing Comment

by:EESky
ID: 39997578
Thank you !
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