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Posted on 2014-04-10
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By default the space in bytes or something

JUst to verify

df -k /appl/oracle/TSSUDALM/exp01/exp
Filesystem    1024-blocks      Free %Used    Iused %Iused Mounted on
/dev/ora_db01_exp_vg    35651584  30097928   16%     1067     1% /oracle/db01/exp01
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Question by:tonydba
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woolmilkporc earned 2000 total points
ID: 39991788
By default the space is shown in 512-byte blocks in systems adhering to POSIX, like AIX etc.

To get this behaviour in GNU/Linux you must set the environment variable "POSIXLY_CORRECT".

POSIXLY_CORRECT=1 df /appl/oracle/TSSUDALM/exp01/exp

With the "-k" flag as in your question it's shown in kilobytes, which is the default in GNU/Linux when POSIXLY_CORRECT is not set.

unset POSIXLY_CORRECT; df /appl/oracle/TSSUDALM/exp01/exp        # same as "df -k ..."

In your example the filesystem has a total of 35651584 KB which is roughly 34.8 GB.

There is (in GNU/Linux) also a "-h" flag ("human readable") and to actually get the values in bytes you can use "--block-size=1"

To make this your default you could create an alias

alias df='df --block-size=1'
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by:tonydba
ID: 39991863
Thank you
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