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Machines logging on the Domain.

Posted on 2014-04-10
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Last Modified: 2014-04-10
Is there something (a script, software (free) I can run to see exactly what's happening when my machines try to login to my network.  I'm looking to see what DC they hit specfically.  I can put the login in Verbose mode to see the policies but I'm looking to see if I can find out how the packets are flowing.  Is this possible?  I would need to run this from my own PC I don't have access to my DCs...
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Question by:WellingtonIS
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Expert Comment

by:eli_cook
ID: 39991866
You can check your logon server by entering the following in the command line
echo %logonserver%

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From the command line you can run the following to see the applied group policy objects and which server the group policy is applied from.
GPRESULT /R

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Could you elaborate a little more on packet flow? Is there specific problem or error you are receiving?
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Author Comment

by:WellingtonIS
ID: 39991874
Yes I'm looking to see how the machine actually connect to the DC's - We have issues logging in long wait times  and I'm trying to figure out the process the machine and the DC's use to connect.
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Expert Comment

by:Brad Bouchard
ID: 39991908
You can check your logon server by entering the following in the command line




echo %logonserver%
1:



Select all

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Another way to do this easily is at the command prompt typing   SET L
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Expert Comment

by:eli_cook
ID: 39991916
I would first check the System Event logs for errors in processing Group Policy. Long wait times during login can be attributed to timeouts for Group Policy resources that are not available. I would also look at any errors that occur during a logon on the workstation. To do this I would either set a mark time that you use as your restart and only look at errors after that time or clear the event log and then restart the machine for a login.

Does this affect all machines all the time on the network or is it intermittent or only with specific machines?
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Assisted Solution

by:Brad Bouchard
Brad Bouchard earned 1000 total points
ID: 39991922
Yes I'm looking to see how the machine actually connect to the DC's - We have issues logging in long wait times  and I'm trying to figure out the process the machine and the DC's use to connect.
Try using Wireshark.  Guide here:  http://www.wireshark.org/download/docs/user-guide-a4.pdf
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Author Comment

by:WellingtonIS
ID: 39991925
not all machines just some.  But I think there's issues with the DC's because they are replicating to an office a few states away and I thing i'm logging in over the wan not locally
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Author Comment

by:WellingtonIS
ID: 39991930
echo %logonserver%
1:



Select all

Open in new window


Another way to do this easily is at the command prompt typing   SET L


Will this tell if it the machine attempted to login to some other DC before It logged into mine?  Or just where the machine landed (so to speak)
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Expert Comment

by:Brad Bouchard
ID: 39991932
Just where it landed unfortunately.
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Author Comment

by:WellingtonIS
ID: 39991941
I'm looking to see before that when the machine goes out and requests service to the DC...
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Expert Comment

by:eli_cook
ID: 39991947
Run the following command:
nltest /dsgetsite

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This should return the Active Directory Site your computer is associated with.

Then run the command with the name of the logon server:
nltest /server:servernamehere /dsgetsite

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This will return the Active Directory Site that your logon server is associated with.

Are they the same?

If so we need to see if we can figure out if your logon server is indeed at your location or the other.
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Author Comment

by:WellingtonIS
ID: 39991961
yest the results are the same - the name of my site..  But is there a way to check to see if it went out to another DC first?? The structure is we are a large domain spread out over several states.  All DCs are connected.
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Accepted Solution

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eli_cook earned 1000 total points
ID: 39991993
It shouldn't be contacting another site, using DNS your computer requests information about the KDC then contacts the KDC for authentication. Microsoft has a detailed break down of the interactive login process here. Like Brad had mentioned you would need to use some software like wireshark if you wanted to monitor everything that passes through your network cable.
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Author Comment

by:WellingtonIS
ID: 39992021
I totally agree with you but I still suspect that some how we are.  I'll try wireshare and see.  Thanks all -
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Author Closing Comment

by:WellingtonIS
ID: 39992024
Thanks all
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Expert Comment

by:eli_cook
ID: 39992025
I would use Resultant Set of Policy (RSoP) to determine what your group policy looks like.
Type the following at the command line:  
rsop

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to bring up the screen. You will need to analyze the areas here to determine if say a batch script is being run at logon that is meant for another site.

Logon scripts can be found Under User Configuration --> Windows Settings --> Scripts --> Logon

You will need to look at each of the scripts individually.
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