Solved

iSCSI MPIO disconnections

Posted on 2014-04-10
6
569 Views
Last Modified: 2014-04-17
Hello Experts,

We have a test cluster setup with MPIO and all seems to be working well.
The setup is using Windows Server 2012 r2 with a qnap as the backend storage.

Routes are as follows;
172.16.10.10 (qnap port 1)
172.17.10.10 (qnap port 2)

Traffic flows perfectly over each switch with the failover link using MPIO working fine.
The issue we are facing is whenever we disconnect our first link to the qnap to tesy the failover (port 1) the other link kicks in fine however when we restore the 172.16.10.10 link it doesn't automatically map the iSCSI target. So if link 2 (port 2) was to fail the entire cluster fails until we either reconnect the iSCSI target manually or we reboot the server.

My impression is that when a link goes down the other kicks in and once the first link is repaired it should automatically reconnect to the target?

Is there an automatic reconnect setting I'm missing?

Thanks people!
0
Comment
Question by:dqnet
  • 3
  • 3
6 Comments
 
LVL 17

Expert Comment

by:Brad Bouchard
ID: 39992619
This is ironic, but my search for auto reconnect turned this up:

http://serverfault.com/questions/588177/iscsi-mpio-disconnections

Look familiar?
0
 

Author Comment

by:dqnet
ID: 39994699
Had to try all my options.. :)

Any opinions on the question though?
0
 
LVL 17

Accepted Solution

by:
Brad Bouchard earned 500 total points
ID: 39994722
Great question first of all, because there are a ton of people who probably have the same question.  I know I did at one point.

As far as my advice on it, I would have gone down the same path as the user who answered your question on serverfault.com, however the one thing that I wanted to add originally and stopped myself from doing after seeing his 2nd reply was about the Round Robin.  As far as performance goes as long as you have your MPIO targets correctly configured in Hyper-V, or in VMware iSCSI kernels (one per iSCSI target by the way if you ever do VMware), then the hypervisor (Hyper-V in this case) looks for the least used/optimized path/target to send the next connection or set of data over.  I didn't want to sound like I copied him, but Round Robin coupled with the advice he gave you on the active/primary paths makes for some great failover.
0
Problems using Powershell and Active Directory?

Managing Active Directory does not always have to be complicated.  If you are spending more time trying instead of doing, then it's time to look at something else. For nearly 20 years, AD admins around the world have used one tool for day-to-day AD management: Hyena. Discover why

 

Author Comment

by:dqnet
ID: 39998287
Hi Brad,

Thanks for the thumbs up.
I am just a little confused as to what you mean if it is configured correctly in HyperV?
We just use standard Windows Clustering Service.. Is there further setup involved in acheiving MPIO in the HyperV setup after the above?

Thanks mate!
0
 
LVL 17

Expert Comment

by:Brad Bouchard
ID: 39999050
I am just a little confused as to what you mean if it is configured correctly in HyperV?
We just use standard Windows Clustering Service.. Is there further setup involved in acheiving MPIO in the HyperV setup after the above?
No worries.  Simply put, what I meant was that there were only really two big things to check on and that was if Round Robin was selected and the active/primary target, both of which you already have.  My comment was more for historical purposes so that when someone else reads this post who has the same question/problem as you they will know those are the two key points.

You are golden my friend.
0
 

Author Comment

by:dqnet
ID: 40007270
Hello again Brad,

Sorry for the delay mate.. I wanted to test it and make sure it all worked first.
And goes what.. It did. What a great setup. It's all switching across seamlessly.
I did have to delete all connections and Luns and rebuilt the entire iSCSI setup but it worked perfectly.

Hope this helps anyone!

Thanks again mate.
0

Featured Post

Best Practices: Disaster Recovery Testing

Besides backup, any IT division should have a disaster recovery plan. You will find a few tips below relating to the development of such a plan and to what issues one should pay special attention in the course of backup planning.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Suggested Solutions

#Citrix #Citrix Netscaler #HTTP Compression #Load Balance
Join Greg Farro and Ethan Banks from Packet Pushers (http://packetpushers.net/podcast/podcasts/pq-show-93-smart-network-monitoring-paessler-sponsored/) and Greg Ross from Paessler (https://www.paessler.com/prtg) for a discussion about smart network …
This video teaches viewers how to encrypt an external drive that requires a password to read and edit the drive. All tasks are done in Disk Utility. Plug in the external drive you wish to encrypt: Make sure all previous data on the drive has been …
In this tutorial you'll learn about bandwidth monitoring with flows and packet sniffing with our network monitoring solution PRTG Network Monitor (https://www.paessler.com/prtg). If you're interested in additional methods for monitoring bandwidt…

920 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question

Need Help in Real-Time?

Connect with top rated Experts

14 Experts available now in Live!

Get 1:1 Help Now