Solved

Convert CPP to C#

Posted on 2014-04-12
6
546 Views
Last Modified: 2014-04-12
How do I convert the following to C#

struct fpoint : pair<double> {
    fpoint() : pair<double>() { }
    fpoint(double x, double y) : pair<double>(x, y) { }
};
0
Comment
Question by:JElster
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
6 Comments
 
LVL 86

Assisted Solution

by:jkr
jkr earned 100 total points
ID: 39996739
The C# equivalent could be

public struct fpoint : System.Collections.Generic.KeyValuePair<double,double> {
    fpoint() : base() { }
    fpoint(double x, double y) : base((x, y) { }
}; 

Open in new window

0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:JElster
ID: 39996749
Get a bunch of compile errors,, like missing param.
Probably close... thx
0
 
LVL 86

Expert Comment

by:jkr
ID: 39996758
Soory, had my mind tilted towards C++ a bit too much - does

public struct fpoint : System.Collections.Generic.KeyValuePair<double,double> {
    fpoint() : base() { }
    fpoint(double x, double y) : base() { key = x; value = y; }
}; 
                                            

Open in new window


work better?
0
Independent Software Vendors: We Want Your Opinion

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:JElster
ID: 39996764
Error      3      Structs cannot contain explicit parameterless constructors      

Error      2      Type 'System.Collections.Generic.KeyValuePair<...>' in interface list is not an interface
0
 
LVL 75

Accepted Solution

by:
käµfm³d   👽 earned 400 total points
ID: 39996766
I disagree slightly, but I don't think it's of major concern. From what I read, the Tuple class would be closer to the exact match for pair.

e.g.

public class fpoint : Tuple<double, double>
{
    public fpoint() : base(default(double), default(double)) { }
    public fpoint(double x, double y) : base(x, y) { }
}

Open in new window


The reason I disagree is that in C# you cannot reassign struct members once you have created the instance--you have to create a second instance with the new values. This is because KeyValuePair is a value type. A Tuple is a reference type, so you can reassign its member even after the instance is created. Albeit in either case there is no swap method, so you'd need to roll your own.
0
 
LVL 75

Expert Comment

by:käµfm³d 👽
ID: 39996770
Actually, never mind. The Tuple's members are read-only also. I saw "tuple" mentioned in the documentation I linked to, so I naturally thought it would be the equivalent. I think either data structure would yield the same results.

Of course, you could always write your own class/struct to be an exact match!
0

Featured Post

Announcing the Most Valuable Experts of 2016

MVEs are more concerned with the satisfaction of those they help than with the considerable points they can earn. They are the types of people you feel privileged to call colleagues. Join us in honoring this amazing group of Experts.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

This article describes a simple method to resize a control at runtime.  It includes ready-to-use source code and a complete sample demonstration application.  We'll also talk about C# Extension Methods. Introduction In one of my applications…
Container Orchestration platforms empower organizations to scale their apps at an exceptional rate. This is the reason numerous innovation-driven companies are moving apps to an appropriated datacenter wide platform that empowers them to scale at a …
The viewer will be introduced to the technique of using vectors in C++. The video will cover how to define a vector, store values in the vector and retrieve data from the values stored in the vector.
The viewer will be introduced to the member functions push_back and pop_back of the vector class. The video will teach the difference between the two as well as how to use each one along with its functionality.

687 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question