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Adding a wireless access point

Posted on 2014-04-15
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Last Modified: 2014-04-15
Hello Experts,

Our office has a hard wired router and a network switch.  If I just wanted to add wireless access for users, what would be the best route to take?  I wouldn't need a router.  There are free ports on the switch, can I hook a wireless access point into one of the free ports or am I off base here?

Thanks,
Mike
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Question by:jumptohigh
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6 Comments
 
LVL 24

Accepted Solution

by:
smckeown777 earned 167 total points
ID: 40002688
Yes...simply get a regular access point and connect to switch like you mentioned and you are good to go...
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LVL 95

Assisted Solution

by:John Hurst
John Hurst earned 167 total points
ID: 40002752
When you hook the point into the switch, you will want to give it a Static IP on the network. Any reset might cause it to lose its connection and Static IP prevents this. If the access point has a DHCP server, disable this (turn DHCP OFF). The two things together make the access point an extension of the network as far as users are concerned.
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LVL 10

Assisted Solution

by:Rafael
Rafael earned 166 total points
ID: 40002760
Yes, you can do this.  However, something to consider is that the wireless access point and your existing switch can also only handle so much traffic themselves.  I don’t know the architecture of your network, but if you go this route I would say plug it into a GB Port or use a GB switch.  Remember that video & audio streams consume bandwidth and can saturate a lower 100MB switch.  If the purpose of the AP is to allow Wi-Fi access for the users access the Internet from their personal devices (phone, tablet) and not touch corporate resources then you may want to keep these users on a different VLAN than you regular network traffic.  Some things to consider are:
•      Make sure your AP has the lasted firmware.
•      Do not broadcast your SSID
•      Disable Wi-fi Protected Setup (WPS)
•      Set up WPA2+AES
•      Limit the DHCP reservation to only use what is needed. This will keep users from just riding the Wi-Fi and force them to reconnect their devices.
•      Set up a window of authentication times. This will prevent access outside of normal business hours.
•      Have your users sign an AUP

Hope this helps.
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Author Closing Comment

by:jumptohigh
ID: 40002776
Thanks to all!!!
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Author Comment

by:jumptohigh
ID: 40002779
Any brands/models you would recommend?
0
 
LVL 95

Expert Comment

by:John Hurst
ID: 40002792
I use HP Wireless Access points and in my own home office I use a Cisco RV220W router used an access point. I like the Cisco unit very much.
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