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http server question

Hi Experts,
I know this is almost 100% not possible, but just in case.  Is it possible to listen on a port on a machine (on localhost), where if the server is running in a given session, it won't be visible to other sessions?

Or, is there a way to communicate from a web browser other than using plugins and other than using http requests to something on localhost?

Just brainstorming.

Thanks,
Mike
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thready
Asked:
thready
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2 Solutions
 
Dave BaldwinFixer of ProblemsCommented:
That doesn't make a whole lot of sense.  The whole purpose of web browsers is to communicate using HTTP.  They can also use FTP.

The software that most frequently does something like you're talking about is your anti-virus software.  AV software usually sets up a 'proxy' that all traffic is routed thru so that it can be checked for viruses and malware.  This is way beyond 'web programming'.
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jkrCommented:
What bowser are you thinking of? Would "rolling your own" be an option?
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threadyAuthor Commented:
Hi Dave, this is in fact way beyond web programming...  :)   Working on a very complicated piece of enterprise software that communicates to many different types of servers...

jkr - nope - we need to stick to chrome, firefox and IE...

I knew my question was a shot in the dark, just hoping for some open minded innovation!  Not always possible though- especially with the tightening of the browser security models.
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Dave BaldwinFixer of ProblemsCommented:
I don't believe there is any reliable native way to "talk to the browsers" other than HTTP.  While I'm certain that it is possible to hook into the browsers, it's just as likely to get 'unhooked' with the next update.  Chrome and Firefox update fairly frequently.
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threadyAuthor Commented:
Sounds like you've been having "fun" with this kind of thing as well...  And just in case - I'm not interested in talking "to" the browser - the browser remains a client in what I'm looking for.  For instance, we've used JSONP, http and https so far...  even a plugin where the former wasn't possible...  I'm always open to anything else people might have up their sleeve....

Thanks,
Mike
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jkrCommented:
>>nope - we need to stick to chrome, firefox and IE...

What a pity - we did something similar recently by creating our own WebKit-based browser, adding a custom communications layer and connecting that back to the browser via a Qt bridge...
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threadyAuthor Commented:
That sounds very interesting!  I'm not sure I get it though...

I just looked up Qt bridge - looks like you've got direct access to your thick application code through javascript because the underlying object model is QObject like in the declarative framework?
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jkrCommented:
Yup, that's it. We mainly need a JS interaction with the server without a HTTP connection and just created a simple driver class like

class CommDriver : public QObject {

    Q_OBJECT

    CommDriver(QWebFrame*);
    virtual ~CommDriver();

    int  CommRequest(const QString& s, CommThread* p);
    void CommResult(const QString& sId, const QString& sRes);
    bool HasConnector() const { return m_hDll && m_pReq;}


public slots:
    Q_INVOKABLE
    bool createRequest(const QString& sReqId, const QString& sReq);

signals:

    void returnRequest(const QString& sReqId, const QString& sResponse);

    const QString& GetRequest() const { return m_sRequest;}
    void SetRequest(const QString& s) { m_sRequest = s;}

    const QString& GetResponse() const { return m_sResponse;}
    void SetResponse(const QString& s) { m_sResponse = s;}

protected:

    QString m_sRequest;
    QString m_sResponse;

protected:

    QWebFrame* m_frame;

    HINSTANCE m_hDll;
    FPTR_CommClientRequest m_pReq;

    unsigned m_unThreadCount;
    QThreadPool m_pool;

private slots:
    void addJSObject();
};

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that was then added via

            // Signal is emitted before frame loads any web content:
            QObject::connect(m_frame, SIGNAL(javaScriptWindowObjectCleared()),
                             this, SLOT(addJSObject()));

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That way, the loaded JS code could "talk" to the server via an arbitrary connection implemented in the driver. Just out of fun, we even created a small server in a DLL that the driver loaded (you can see the handle declared in the snippet).
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threadyAuthor Commented:
Very cool.  I've been getting hooked on Qt mobile.  Particularly QML...  Thanks for sharing!
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threadyAuthor Commented:
Thanks guys, this answers my question - it's not possible!  :)
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