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Import SQL tables into access database

I have a multitude of tables in SQL server management studio 2008 that I want to import into an access database 2007 version.
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mishlce
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mishlce
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1 Solution
 
Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE)PresidentCommented:
You can import that using the external data tab, import.

Be aware that there is a 2GB limit on a Access database container.   You can get around that a bit by putting some tables in one, some tables in another, and then linking to each.  However you can't establish relationships across containers.

This is kind of unusual.  Usually you go the other way; what is it your trying to accomplish?

Jim.
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Jim HornMicrosoft SQL Server Developer, Architect, and AuthorCommented:
SQL Server SSMS:  Click on a database, then right-click:Tasks: Export Data, then follow the prompts.  In the 'Choose a Destination' dialog make sure you select Access.

Access to SQL:  Jim has that one above.

>I want to import into an access database 2007 version.
Spell out for us whether you want to import (meaning copy data) into Access, or link (meaning the data still resides in SQL, but Access has linked tables to it and can use it just like they were local tables).
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mishlceAuthor Commented:
I want to keep all tables in SQL but I want some also in an Access database as we have a user here that only knows access and needs some of the data to manipulate.  Linking may be a better option.  How to do is the question.
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Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE)PresidentCommented:
<<I want to keep all tables in SQL but I want some also in an Access database as we have a user here that only knows access and needs some of the data to manipulate. >>

 Linking would most likely be a far better option.  However if they are actually updating data, then you will need to add a timestamp column to the SQL tables for Access to be able to update them properly.

 If they are only doing reporting, then no changes need be made.

<<How to do is the question. >>

 You can split points, or select Jim H's comment as he mentioned linking first.

Jim.
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Jim HornMicrosoft SQL Server Developer, Architect, and AuthorCommented:
>and needs some of the data to manipulate.
Define 'manipulate'.

If they're doing production processes and you want those changes to be permanent, then linking is fine.

If they need some data to play with / use as a basis of their development, and you don't want any changes to be permanent, then import a copy of those tables into Access.
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mishlceAuthor Commented:
no data will be changed in the tables.  I think linking might be the best option as she is just going to perform queries and reports in access without changing any data in the tables as it is auto updated in SQL daily.  Pls provide instructions on linking SQL tables to access.  Thanks.;
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