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set file permissions (2774) via perl upload script

Posted on 2014-04-17
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Last Modified: 2014-06-07
Hello All

I have a script that uploads a file via HTTP on Apache and AIX.
The script works well.
Only issue is that the uploaded file is created with permissions 0644.
I need permissions 2774, note that 2 is Set GID. This is required by the 3rd party app that then takes the file after upload and imports it. When set only to 0644 the 3rd party app cannot read the file.
The file is an xml formatted file uploaded from a supplier.

I have tried adding the following command to the upload script but it does not make the required change, no error is returned.
my $mode = 2774;
system "chmod $mode, $filename";

Directory and file owner & group permissions are set to; nobody.users
The upload directory is not in the path of the Apache web service so security is not the first issue here.

Any assistance is appreciated.


Thanks in advance.
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Question by:hairylots
7 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:Jan Springer
ID: 40006460
Have you tried using perl's chmod?
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LVL 62

Expert Comment

by:gheist
ID: 40006733
Apache on AIX does not run as root, so it cannot change those permission bits.
Use sftp or something that allows to change permissions.
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Author Comment

by:hairylots
ID: 40008083
Hello gheist

Thankyou for that tip.
SFTP is not an option. I am stuck between 2x 3rd parties, 1st is the supply of xml data who state only via http upload and 2nd is the application owner who require the set GID bit.

If Apache will not allow this without running as root (very bad idea), then I need to think outside the square and use something like inotify or cron tasks as root. Open to suggestions.

Hello _jesper_
I am not familiar with perl chmod, is that different to system chmod?

Thanks in advance.
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LVL 3

Expert Comment

by:bigbed
ID: 40108660
Your command is "chmod $mode, $filename".
I think you need to remove the comma, to give "chmod $mode $filename"
I can't see anything in the AIX docs about it being limited to root (but I don't have an AIX machine to hand).
good luck,
Tim
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Author Comment

by:hairylots
ID: 40110272
Hello bigbed

The command works as is in a perl script when run as root.
Issue is that other special users need to execute that script not as root, the HTTP upload does not set the correct permissions when it is uploaded to allow group users to make the change.
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Accepted Solution

by:
gheist earned 500 total points
ID: 40110330
Permosdion 0x2000 can be set only by root
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Author Closing Comment

by:hairylots
ID: 40120062
correct answer
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