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Excel stupid question

Posted on 2014-04-17
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Last Modified: 2014-04-17
Hello All,
Sure enough I  am not sure what i am doing ...playing with a bunch of formulas :( done by someone esle...
What does this mean?
Sheet1!$1:$1048576
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Question by:Rayne
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6 Comments
 
LVL 70

Expert Comment

by:KCTS
ID: 40007562
Its referring to cell A:1048576 on a sheet called sheet1
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LVL 70

Assisted Solution

by:KCTS
KCTS earned 200 total points
ID: 40007571
... you can force Excel to use numbers for both row and column rather than column letter
and row number

BTW the $ indicates the cell reference is fixed and will not be changed of the formula is copied or moved.
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Author Comment

by:Rayne
ID: 40007612
Couldn’t get that? It is referring to 1048576 columns across starting from column A? or what it is the row starting from row 1 all the way to 1048576th row? Across or down….please explain
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LVL 23

Accepted Solution

by:
NBVC earned 1600 total points
ID: 40007648
Sheet1!$1:$1048576 refers to every row in Sheet1.  Excel uses letters to define the columns and numbers to define the rows.

For example A1 is top left most cell in a sheet and XFD1048576 is bottom right most cell.

Referencing Sheet1!$1:$1048576 in effect references the whole sheet.  You could have used Sheet1!A:XFD also to reference the whole sheet.
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LVL 93

Assisted Solution

by:Patrick Matthews
Patrick Matthews earned 200 total points
ID: 40007707
No points, please :)

>>Sheet1!$1:$1048576 refers to every row in Sheet1.

This is correct.

>>Excel uses letters to define the columns and numbers to define the rows.

This is correct if the default A1 notation style is in use.  There is however an alternative R1C1 style.
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Author Closing Comment

by:Rayne
ID: 40007939
Thank you all :)
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