saving office (access or excel)- corruption

Hello All,

i hear that the most number of times (in zillions) that you save an excel - the more weird metadata changes happen in it - and as a result the size bloats up unnecessary with time....so doing a save-as is better than saving the file ?

What do you think - i have heard that if you keep saving a excel file for a long time - it can increase the chances of that getting corrupted in future due to unknown reasons- will a save as is better than a save?

Thank you
RayneAsked:
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RayneAuthor Commented:
what is better and why do you think so

...thank you
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byundtMechanical EngineerCommented:
When Excel saves a file, it writes it to the hard drive using a random filename. If the file is successfully written, the hard drive file allocation table is rewritten to delete the original file (in a Save) and substitute the new one (both Save and Save As).

The benefit of the above approach is that a hard drive crash/power interruption/cable being disconnected or other technical hiccup doesn't risk losing both the original and latest copies of the file. At worst, you lose your changes.

The corollary of the above approach is that file bloat isn't affected by whether you do a Save or Save As.


File bloat can occur due to file corruption. Workbooks that are used simultaneously by more than one person using the "Share Workbook" feature are especially prone to this problem.

File bloat can occur due to a mix of formatting when you insert/delete data. You can often reduce file size by removing all formatting from a worksheet, then applying it to entire columns of data.

File bloat can occur if Excel thinks that the end of data is somewhere far below the real end of data. There shouldn't be any travel left in the vertical & horizontal scrollbars when you reach the end of your data. If there is, select all the rows below the data and delete them. Ditto with the columns to the right of the data.
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RayneAuthor Commented:
thank you byundt :)
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