[Okta Webinar] Learn how to a build a cloud-first strategyRegister Now

x
  • Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 341
  • Last Modified:

what does this code mean?

I came cross these lines of codes and can't understand them. Anyone here could help me with them?  Thank you.

#PS1="\[\033[1;31m\][\$(date +%H%M)][\u@\h \[\033[01;34m\]\W $ \[\033[00m\]"
#PS2='> '
#PS4='+ '

#if [ $USER = "oracle" ]; then
#  if [ $SHELL = "/bin/ksh" ]; then
#    ulimit -p 16384
#    ulimit -n 65536
#  else
#    ulimit -u 16384 -n 65536
#  fi
#fi
0
Jason Yu
Asked:
Jason Yu
3 Solutions
 
Pasha KravtsovCommented:
PS1 is part of a configuration which you can see by typing 'set' into the console. Specifically whenever you use bash or sh you see usually
[user@hostname directory/you're/at] $ ls

Open in new window

Something of that nature and PS2 and PS4 if I recall correctly do the same thing just different sytles? Here is a great article on it http://www.thegeekstuff.com/2008/09/bash-shell-take-control-of-ps1-ps2-ps3-ps4-and-prompt_command/

looks like if your user is oracle then see if it's using the shell ksh and change ulimit options based on it
http://ss64.com/bash/ulimit.html
^ great man page on it
0
 
ozoCommented:
Is there a #! line at the top of the file to say what language this is in?
It looks like all the code is commented out, so it seems to mean nothing.
0
 
simon3270Commented:
The PS1 lines set sthe shell prompt to the current time (HHMM), the user name and the host name (all in red), then the current directory (just the directory name, not the full path) in light blue.

PS2 is the prompt used when a continuation line is required (e.g. if you don't close a quoted string on the command line, or you type a "for" or "while" loop into the shell.

PS4 is the string that the shell uses to go in front of lines it will be executing, if "set -x" has been run.

The "if" test at the end only does the work for the "oracle" user.  It sets the maximum size of a pipe between processes (the "-p" option), and the maximum number of open file descriptors (-n).  In the Korn shell, these must be done as separate commands - in other shells they can be done as multiple settings on a single command (though note that the Bash shell says that you can't set -p).
0
 
Pasha KravtsovCommented:
@ozo that might be your .bashrc? I'm not sure
0
 
Jason YuAuthor Commented:
yes, it's from a .bashrc file. I will read all the references.

Thank you guys here.
0

Featured Post

Configuration Guide and Best Practices

Read the guide to learn how to orchestrate Data ONTAP, create application-consistent backups and enable fast recovery from NetApp storage snapshots. Version 9.5 also contains performance and scalability enhancements to meet the needs of the largest enterprise environments.

Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now