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Mobo vs memory - What's the Truth

Posted on 2014-04-24
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Can you use an Asus p7h57d-v evo mobo with Corsair Vengeance 16gb 2x8 cmz16cgx3m2a1600c10 the settings are what? I know it's not on the list but I've read you can if tweak the settings & others say that it's not on the list. Whats the truth.
Thanks for the help.
It says on the memory 10- 10- 10- 27 1.5v
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Question by:Etrix
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by:Red-King
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I don't see whey it wouldn't.
The Memory specs match the board specs for RAM i.e. non-ECC, Unbuffered, DDR3 1600/1333MHz, Intel XMP

http://www.corsair.com/en/vengeance-16gb-dual-channel-ddr3-memory-kit-cmz16gx3m2a1600c10
http://www.asus.com/Motherboards/P7H57DV_EVO/specifications/

I don't imagine it would cause any particular issues but if you were to use it and the board fried then you'd have no comeback with Asus as the RAMs not on the list.
The fact that its not on the list means that Asus either havn't tested it or they did test it and found a problem. Either way the list is just their way of saying 'We'll listen to you if you've done things the way we said.'
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kadafitcd earned 500 total points
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ASUS's site isn't working at the moment for me.  But according to Crucial the board supports 16 GB but it only supports a maximum of 4 GB per slot.  So the 8 GB sticks will not work. Sorry to let you know the bad news.  Return them for a refund.
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by:kadafitcd
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Don't worry about what Red-King said.  RAM will not fry a Mobo unless it's installed backwards or it's not the right type IE DDR2 in a DDR3 Slot and then it can short things out by pinching connectors together.  So if you've installed it and it's just not booting then most likely the board is fine.
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by:Etrix
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thanks kadafitcd, You nailed it. I just found out from an IT friend who has access to the Geek Squad database, the same the same thing. He said it has to be 4x4.
Thanks for your help.
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by:Red-King
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I've had a look over the ASUS website and I've found the 4GB limit mentioned only once in the manual where it mentions "You may install 1GB, 2GB and 4GB unbuffered and non-ECC DDR3 DIMMs into the DIMM sockets."
It seems like the board was released in 2009 so it may be that 4GB was the max consumer DDR3 RAM available at the time.
I would suggest trying the 8GB modules if you have them as they might work. Worst case the PC won't boot.

I also wanted to point out, in saying "the board fried" in my previous post, I wasn't suggesting the RAM fried the board. Simply put, if the board fried for any reason, with the unsupported RAM installed, ASUS may well wash their hands of the problem as you were using unsupported hardware at the time.
This is a common approach taken by manufacturers.
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by:Lee W, MVP
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First, understand that manufacturers and large service companies such as GeekSquad will officially only tell you the manufacturer has ok'd.  Doing anything else would create more work for them and potentially save you time/money.

I've had systems that state Max 1 GB of RAM (Dell Laptop) that ran FINE for years with 1.5 GB.  I had an Acer system that said Max 4GB (4x1), but ran fine for years with 6 GB (2x1, 2x2) but WOULD crash if I pushed it to 8 GB (4x2).  Most motherboards do not list all RAM because there is WAAAAAY too much RAM available and new RAM added to the market seemingly daily - so they test a small subset and define it as compatible and call it a day.  I've had RAM from company X not work in motherboard A but work fine in Motherboard B while RAM from Company Y worked fine in both.

BIOS COULD be a limiting factor but in general - SO LONG AS YOU DON'T MIND POTENTIALLY VOIDING THE WARRANTY OF THE RAM, MOTHERBOARD, OR BOTH - You can try RAM beyond the spec of the manufacturer so long as it's the right type (ECC/Non-ECC, DDR/DDR2/DD3, Buffered/Unbuffered, etc).

And I would consider the RAM causing the motherboard to fry to be so remote as to be a non-issue.  (I might say never - except that I almost never say never).
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