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In windows XP how do I change settings for a folder so other subfolders can not be deleted ?

In an professional environment that a several different people are accessing and working on different shared documents on a network (and possibly at the same time) is there a way to allow users to modify documents but not delete any subfolders?

Is there a way to change a settings so if they do delete a subfolder or document that they are prompted immediately asking if they are sure they want to delete?

If this is not possible in XP, does Windows 7 have the capabilities?

Any insight would be greatly appreciated
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JoeBader
Asked:
JoeBader
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5 Solutions
 
Thomas GrassiSystems AdministratorCommented:
Where are the files?

On a server? On a network storage device?

It all is on the security permissions and NTFS permissions
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JoeBaderAuthor Commented:
It is on a network running as a "work group" .  The server is the admin and the other PC are users with full privileges for those files. The server is running Windows Server 2008.

In the recent past we update from SBS 2003 to the 2008. I did find the capability while on 2003.

The problem is if 2 people have one folder open and let's say it has 8 subfolders then the file splits if one person tries to move it.  I need it to have the folders locked but be able to modify documents and add documents. Is the possible?
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Thomas GrassiSystems AdministratorCommented:
On the server you have accounts setup for each user that logs on the local computer

On the file server you setup shares so the users can access them

You need to go to the share and check the security settings

On the server you can create groups to make this easier so you do not have to add each user

What type of documents are you opening?
Word and excel alert you if someone else has the same file opened.

Are you using office? which version.

Most of your work will be on the server
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JoeBaderAuthor Commented:
Yes mostly word & excel.

Word 2003

So it sounds like the capabilities might be possibly.
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Thomas GrassiSystems AdministratorCommented:
Yes

But you need to check the permissions on the server shares.

Also you are aware that Windows XP is no longer supported OS by Microsoft.

Any plans to upgrading to newer OS? Office too.
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JoeBaderAuthor Commented:
Yes, thanks the majority are now into Win 7.

Thank you
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Jeffrey Kane - TechSoEasyPrincipal ConsultantCommented:
If you have a large document library, then it would be best to use something better than Windows File System to help you manage access to files and avoid the type of problem you are describing.

SharePoint is one of the best solutions for this.

Is your Server 2008 also SBS?  ie, does it have Exchange and SharePoint?  If not, when you moved away from your SBS 2003, did you move your email offsite?  Does that service provide SharePoint for you?  (ie, Office 365 or Intermedia, etc)

Jeff
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JoeBaderAuthor Commented:
Hello Jeff-

I appreciate the insight. SharePoint is a cool program.

Yes when we moved to Windows Server 2008 R2 standard we went a different route for email as we were not utilizing enough of the SBS features at that point. Is that a feature that could be added without a complete re-install of windows?

We still have the 2003 SBS licenses but no share point on that either.
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Jeffrey Kane - TechSoEasyPrincipal ConsultantCommented:
You don't want to be using Server 2003 for anything (and yes, SharePoint WAS on your SBS 2003, you may just never have used it).

Installing SharePoint does NOT require reinstalling Windows at all -- licensing for SharePoint Foundation Server (designed for smaller organizations such as yours) is FREE.

Download here:  http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=24983

And all the documentation you'll need (which you definitely should read) is here:
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sharepoint/ee263910.aspx#tab=1
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JoeBaderAuthor Commented:
Jeff- you are the man!

That looks really cool. The one thing I did not see directly was if I could set it up to not be online via the internet. For additional security measures I was thinking about accessibility just on our local network do you know if that is possible?
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Jeffrey Kane - TechSoEasyPrincipal ConsultantCommented:
You definitely can make it available over the Internet, but to be honest, without using Small Business Server 2011, it is a complex process to ensure security.  If you have a firewall that has VPN capabilities, you may just want to enable that to be able to browse the SharePoint site remotely.

Alternatively, if you do find that you want users to be able to have access to documents from anywhere, you could always sign up for SharePoint online via Office 365, which will run you $3.00 per user per month.
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JoeBaderAuthor Commented:
Excellent insight, very much appreciated!
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