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Excel Auto increment one column based on another

Posted on 2014-04-25
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Last Modified: 2014-05-01
Hi Experts!

I have a column (Column A) of work order numbers that vary in the number of times they repeat.  Is there a formula I can use in another column to assign a number (1, 2, 3, etc.) based on the number of times a number is repeated in Column A?

Please see attached.  I'd prefer a formula vs. VBA if possible.  Thanks for your help!
Count-Test.xlsx
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Question by:xllvr
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Shaun Kline earned 500 total points
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You can use the COUNTIF function to do this. You would anchor the range to the first cell with an order number.
It would be similar to this: (This is assuming A1 has a title for your column. If not adjust accordingly.)
=COUNTIF($A$2:A2, A2)

If you put this in B2 and drag/fill down to the row with your last order number, it will count the number of occurrences of the order number that appear in the range.
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by:xllvr
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I was so in the weeds I did not even consider such a simple solution.  Thank you!!!!  It's perfect.
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by:xllvr
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Hi Shaun,

I've pounded on this a bit further and see it's failing within the List/Table structure.  It wasn't apparent at first, but if I add to the bottom of the table, the formula copies down but grabs more data below than it should.  The attached showed clearly what's happening.

So sorry I didn't catch this initially.  It seemed to work so beautifully until now.  I have to believe there's a simple fix.  If I need to re-open and assign more points, I'd be happy to do that.  Thank you!
Count-Test.xlsx
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by:Shaun Kline
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The issue is the formula did not copy down correctly. For the two cells with issues, the formula should have been countif($A$4:A18,A18) and countif($A$4:A19,A19) respectively.
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by:xllvr
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Hey Shaun.  I understand how it works except the formula is auto populating and not in my control.  It's  happening when I add a new entry underneath the table.  The formula jumps rows to include a row further down in the table.  It's a bit odd.  I use tables all the time and have not had this issue before.  If you try adding a new entry below the table, it will likely happen to you as well.  I've gone in and fixed it and then added a new row underneath with the same problem.  

If you've got any suggestions at all, I'd be super grateful!  Thanks again for your help on this!
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by:Shaun Kline
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I believe the issue you are seeing is related to the autocompletion setting. If you insert rows in the middle of your table, the auto complete is incorrectly filling in the adjacent cells. If you turn this off (Microsoft Office button -> Excel Options -> Advanced) you should see different results.
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by:xllvr
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Aha!  I will have to give that a try.  Thank you so much for following up!  I came up with a workaround in another column using ADDRESS and then adding INDIRECT to the formula you and I were working with.  It worked beautifully.  Thanks again, Shaun!
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