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Set up WAP  in the Network

Posted on 2014-04-27
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Last Modified: 2014-05-14
I would like to get a big picture of how to set up Wireless Access Point in the Network.
For instance, let's say we already have a wired network connected to Internet, and we need  to install WAPs in conference rooms so that users who use the rooms will be able to connect to internet.

Assuming there is no wireless LAN Controller  used in the Network..

Can someone explain how to connect and configure the involved components that will get the wireless connection to work.?

Thank you
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Question by:jskfan
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by:smckeown777
smckeown777 earned 200 total points
ID: 40025812
Generally speaking if you purchase a WAP you can plug it into your network and out of the box it will provide wireless access - note each WAP will have a default SSID and most are unsecure - meaning you can connect without a password and get online etc...

Course it depends on the make/model of the WAP...I'm using Netgear as an example

Default SSID - NETGEAR
Security - None
Default IP - 192.168.0.1

To configure the WAP you need to connect to its IP address(some WAP's have all this info on the bottom of the model - password info and all other info you need)

But to assist more...what make/model do you have?
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Author Comment

by:jskfan
ID: 40025969
What I was trying to understand:
Let 's say our Network is already connected to internet, I mean each workstation is wired to the Network and connected to internet, but we need our conference rooms to have Wireless Internet connection for Laptop users.

we'll get a one WAP for each Conference room…Then from there:

Where are we connect each WAP? to any Network Switch?
How are we going to configure each WAP ? IP address, Default Gateway?
How are Laptops going to connect to each WAP, assuming all WAPs have the same SSID and password?

Thank you
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by:smckeown777
smckeown777 earned 200 total points
ID: 40025978
Where are we connect each WAP? to any Network Switch?
Yes

How are we going to configure each WAP ? IP address, Default Gateway?
Each WAP has a default IP address out of the box. Some WAP's get their IP's from DHCP....some are already statically assigned(again refer to bottom of the WAP in most cases to be sure).
WAP's do not need default gateway - they only need that if you want to manage them from a remote location. Why you ask? Because a WAP is simply a network switch with an aerial. Network switches don't need IP's to function...only for management - same with WAP's


How are Laptops going to connect to each WAP, assuming all WAPs have the same SSID and password?
If they have the same SSID and password the laptop will connect to the closest WAP in your location...i.e. you have 2 conference rooms and laptops in Conference room 1 will connect to the WAP in that room...since it is closer than WAP in Conference room 2. Does that answer your question?
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Author Comment

by:jskfan
ID: 40026212
<<<WAP's do not need default gateway - they only need that if you want to manage them from a remote location. Why you ask? Because a WAP is simply a network switch with an aerial. Network switches don't need IP's to function...only for management - same with WAP's>>>

The reason I asked is because WAPs in the Network will get internet connection through the main router that is providing internet connection to user workstations.

for instance, if Out of the box WAP gets IP address of 192.168.1.1, and that address already exists in the network then we'll have to manually change it. and the subnet where wireless devices are should be different than the production subnets…which might be in 10.x.x.x range.


What I need from Wireless Network Expert is to tell me how this can be lined up, for instance:

Get an unmanageable switch, plug it to the port of the internet router, plug each WAP to the unmanageable switch, login to each WAP using the browser and configure IP address and SSID of each WAP, etc..
that was my assumption from someone who does not have knowledge about setting up wireless network in the company, an expert might suggest a better way to do it…


Thanks
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by:Craig Beck
Craig Beck earned 200 total points
ID: 40026226
The reason I asked is because WAPs in the Network will get internet connection through the main router that is providing internet connection to user workstations.
WAPs won't access the internet themselves though - only clients will use the internet connection.

Think of a WAP as a media converter or bridge.  It converts wireless to wired.  Users will need to get to the wired internet connection via the WAP, but the WAP itself won't do anything with the user's traffic other than put it on the wire.

for instance, if Out of the box WAP gets IP address of 192.168.1.1, and that address already exists in the network then we'll have to manually change it. and the subnet where wireless devices are should be different than the production subnets…which might be in 10.x.x.x range.
That's right you may need to change the IP address of the WAP but, as smekeown777 said, that's just to enable management of the WAP.

Get an unmanageable switch, plug it to the port of the internet router, plug each WAP to the unmanageable switch, login to each WAP using the browser and configure IP address and SSID of each WAP, etc..
that was my assumption from someone who does not have knowledge about setting up wireless network in the company, an expert might suggest a better way to do it…
If you have a network with no VLANs, etc, then an unmanaged switch may be fine if you don't want network enhancements such as STP too.  You could just plug a WAP in to any port on the switch and users could get on the internet as long as they can connect to the SSID which is being broadcast.
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Author Comment

by:jskfan
ID: 40027142
So if My production Network is in 10.x.x.x network, and I want Wireless network to be in 192.168.x.x Network,  This may need some specific configuration.

Because the production Network (10.x.x.x) requests for Internet will all be sent to the edge router or firewall that will NAT the network IPs to public addresses…

how can I configure the same thing for Wireless Netwok ?
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Expert Comment

by:smckeown777
ID: 40027226
I assume the end goal here is separation from the production network? Meaning wifi users can't access the production network at all?

In that case yes you need vlans...the router needs to have option to create vlan and your switches need to be managed so they can work with vlans as well...

What make/model is the router and your switches?
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Author Comment

by:jskfan
ID: 40031883
All is going to be Cisco …
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Author Comment

by:jskfan
ID: 40031926
Simple Way:
I guess I will just need to purchase a separate internet router like the one used at home and connect it to a dumb  switch and connect  the WAPs to the switch


Complicated Way:
if I want to provide wireless connection from the existing wired connection in the LAN and with a separate Network Segment (192.168.x.x) then the configuration will  get complicated between the core switch and the Edge Router facing internet.

BECAUSE:

from Core switch we can configure
IP route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.10.10.1 (which is the internal interface IP of Cisco Edge Router or Firewall connecting to Core Switch and that will do the NAT).
When the traffic comes back from internet:
IP route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 10.10.10.2( which is the IP address of the Core switch interface connecting with the EDGE Router)
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Author Comment

by:jskfan
ID: 40050540
I wonder if my above assumption is correct ?
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by:Craig Beck
ID: 40050556
I'll draw a diagram when I get home...
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by:Craig Beck
ID: 40051948
Ok I'm not home yet, but you can do it without having to use dumb switches and a separate internet feed if you really need to.  I would recommend a second internet router though at least if you can integrate that in a DMZ-style.

Basically, create a new VLAN for guest traffic on your switches.  The Cisco AP would have two or more VLANs on it (management/corporate and guest as a minimum).  You could then put a new internet router (connected to your main internet feed) onto the guest VLAN and use that as the guest client's default gateway.  This allows you to use all the same infrastructure in a shared fashion without allowing access to corporate resources from the guest network.

Don't worry about IP addresses for Access Points.  If you use Cisco APs they will use DHCP to obtain an IP by default.  You can then login to the AP and change the IP yourself, so there'll be no issue with IP conflicts.
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Author Comment

by:jskfan
ID: 40053610
Craigback…

Thanks I will wait for the Diagram, to have a good big picture..
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Craig Beck earned 200 total points
ID: 40057355
This is a image I 'borrowed' and edited slightly...

Cisco Wireless Guest Traffic
The diagram shows two separate SSIDs; Corporate and Guest.

You can see in the diagram that Guest and Corporate traffic takes different logical paths.  The Guest traffic gets routed at the firewall only (or a separate router sitting on the Guest VLAN) and uses the switched network purely to get to the firewall.  It's important that none of your L3 switches or corporate routers have an interface which has an IP address on the Guest VLAN or that will allow the possibility for routing into the corporate network.  As a best-practice you should connect a dedicated interface from the firewall to the Guest VLAN.
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by:nappy_d
nappy_d earned 100 total points
ID: 40058626
You will need to configure a single AP with two SSIDs.

Do you already have a managed Cisco switch?

If so and you are familiar with vLANs, you will have to config two vLANs

See this Cisco article for an in depth setup.

 http://www.cisco.com/c/en/us/support/docs/wireless-mobility/wireless-lan-wlan/69773-vlan-ap-config.html
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Author Closing Comment

by:jskfan
ID: 40065968
I will check that …thank you!
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