Go Premium for a chance to win a PS4. Enter to Win

x
?
Solved

Network cable issue

Posted on 2014-04-29
16
Medium Priority
?
345 Views
Last Modified: 2014-07-31
Hi,

We've recently had an extension built at home, and during the process we've fitted 4 network cables into the new room as it's going to be used as an office.

I've connected all the sockets up and tested them with a network tester, however every single socket has issues. All of them have lights not lighting up when the tester checks each cable, and on some two lights appear at the same time.

On one occassion, disconnecting a cable from the socket suddenly forced others to work.

It looks like for 10 centimetre or so the cable pass right next to power cables, and I wondered if this is likely to cause all cables to fail?
0
Comment
Question by:SheppardDigital
16 Comments
 
LVL 14

Expert Comment

by:Zac Harris
ID: 40029724
This could definitely be a cause in the cable failure. Data and power should be kept separate. One reason you never put data and power in the same conduit (Well you're not supposed to anyways)
0
 
LVL 10

Expert Comment

by:Rafael
ID: 40029736
When you pull one "SPECIFIC" new cable, do they all work or does the "SPECIFIC" cable switch each time?

Depends if the cables were made properly. Meaning not crossed.  This link of Cat V cable making will show the correct steps in making the cable.

another factor is placement of the cables when they were ran. For example right on top of a power outlet. This would cause interference unless shielded cable was used. Also, if running in and or around the heating and AC ducts, then plenum cable should have been used.
0
 
LVL 36

Expert Comment

by:Kimputer
ID: 40029737
Actually, today's network cable quality is high enough to put power and networking together without any big issues for 100 or even 1000 mbit. If you're talking about a normal house, those few meters of those cables together really won't make a difference (not noticable anyway). When you use a network tester, and the correct lights won't come up, you have a major problem (having power and network cables together wouldn't cause this, it would cause only different graphs on highly expensive measurement devices). I suspect you didn't use the correct tools to mount the sockets. Send a few pics ?
0
WatchGuard Case Study: Museum of Flight

“With limited money and limited staffing, we didn’t have a lot of choices in terms of what we could do to bring efficiency. WatchGuard played a central part in changing that.” To provide strong, secure Wi-Fi access within the museum, Hunter chose to deploy WatchGuard’s AP120 APs.

 

Author Comment

by:SheppardDigital
ID: 40029739
oh well, I guess I'll have to buy some power line adapters and scrap the network that's been installed.
0
 

Author Comment

by:SheppardDigital
ID: 40029758
Kimputer

Thanks, that at least provides some hope.

I'm going to find some way of testing individual cables to at least confirm that the cables are intact.
0
 
LVL 36

Expert Comment

by:Kimputer
ID: 40029788
Not only how you mounted the sockets is important, also who handled the cables (and how) during the building process. With corners and all, pulling and yanking the cables in tight spots, it still can get damaged. If not easily accessible, you will have a big problem. Sometimes it's still salvageable if non-important cables were damaged (brown/blue, or on your network meter pin 4, 5, 7, 8).
0
 

Author Comment

by:SheppardDigital
ID: 40029791
I've had a look at the cable, and it's very soft with lots of strands of cable within each of the 8.

I'm guessing that when I've connected up the sockets the cable isn't make a good connection (if at all)
0
 
LVL 36

Accepted Solution

by:
Kimputer earned 2000 total points
ID: 40029810
Also, this is the method you can use for individual cable testing (if you have no equipment ready). For each cable, remove from socket, cut off, reveal some copper on all green/orange (including green/white and orange/white) cables. Since these are the only important ones (for normal networking anyway). On one end, connect the copper part of the greens. Connect the oranges. On the other end, use a volt meter, with the function that beeps if the two leads are connected (or where the display will go from 0 to 1, or 1 to 0). Connect one lead to the orange, and the other to the orange/white. If it beeps (or the display changes, depending on your volt meter), the cable is okay. Continue for green, etc etc.
If no volt meter is available, use battery and a light. If a pair lights up, it should work. If for one cable, both greens and oranges light up, the cable should work, and the mounting was the problem.
0
 
LVL 36

Expert Comment

by:Kimputer
ID: 40029818
Maybe you can send a picture (macro mode?), and I can tell you the proper way to mount it (or with which tool).
0
 

Author Comment

by:SheppardDigital
ID: 40029857
Hi Kimputer,

Good suggestion about the orange and orange/white cable. I'll try that now as I have a voltage tester handy.
0
 

Author Comment

by:SheppardDigital
ID: 40029911
Using Kimputers suggestion I've confirmed that the cables themselves are fine, phew!

It's obviously the way the cables connect in the back of the socket. I was using a screwdriver to connect the cables (which has always worked in the past), I'll try and get hold of a proper tool to see if that makes any difference.
0
 
LVL 36

Expert Comment

by:Kimputer
ID: 40030123
Yes, screwdriver is not the way sadly. Where you bought the socket, they can advise you which is the proper tool.
0
 

Author Comment

by:SheppardDigital
ID: 40030135
I'm sure I have the tool in the garage somewhere, I'm going to try and dig it out tonight if I can find it.
0
 

Author Comment

by:SheppardDigital
ID: 40030552
I've found the tool required.

I tried wiring up the sockets again, but I've only managed to get 1/4 working.

I think I've narrowed the problem down to a 4-port facia plate I recently bought. It seems the cables in that particular plate are not making a connection.

I'll purchase a new plate tomorrow and try again.
0
 
LVL 36

Expert Comment

by:Kimputer
ID: 40030615
Please note different types of plates, sometimes require a slightly different kind of tool. Take your tool with you when buying, so the person at the store can tell you if you are using the correct tool.
0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:SheppardDigital
ID: 40231229
I managed to diagnose the issue and replaced all of the facia sockets to resolve the this.

I've marked this as my answer as it was the most helpful to me.
0

Featured Post

Veeam and MySQL: How to Perform Backup & Recovery

MySQL and the MariaDB variant are among the most used databases in Linux environments, and many critical applications support their data on them. Watch this recorded webinar to find out how Veeam Backup & Replication allows you to get consistent backups of MySQL databases.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Every server (virtual or physical) needs a console: and the console can be provided through hardware directly connected, software for remote connections, local connections, through a KVM, etc. This document explains the different types of consol…
#Citrix #Citrix Netscaler #HTTP Compression #Load Balance
In response to a need for security and privacy, and to continue fostering an environment members can turn to for support, solutions, and education, Experts Exchange has created anonymous question capabilities. This new feature is available to our Pr…
Despite its rising prevalence in the business world, "the cloud" is still misunderstood. Some companies still believe common misconceptions about lack of security in cloud solutions and many misuses of cloud storage options still occur every day. …
Suggested Courses

963 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question