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does time(7) need to be in military time

Posted on 2014-04-29
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Last Modified: 2014-04-30
In the database, I have a column set to time(7)

Do time values always have to be in military time.  Can't they be in the normal time?
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Question by:al4629740
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duttcom earned 500 total points
ID: 40030942
The time format is HH:MM:SS and as such there is no value for a.m. or p.m. that would allow you to use 12 hour time instead of 24 hour time.
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by:al4629740
ID: 40030951
So the answer is no.
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by:duttcom
ID: 40030954
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Author Comment

by:al4629740
ID: 40030960
It might be too complicated for me to do it.  I just need a datatype to show it.
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Expert Comment

by:duttcom
ID: 40030972
Try something like this in your select statement -

select CONVERT(varchar(15),YourTimeField,100) as YourTimeField
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Author Comment

by:al4629740
ID: 40031016
Yes, thank you.  The main objective was to have it displayed inherently in the table.

Again.  Thanks
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Expert Comment

by:PortletPaul
ID: 40031419
>> "The main objective was to have it displayed inherently in the table."

not sure what "displayed inherently" means, but a Time(7) field is NOT stored "in a format" at all. Date/Time information is actually stored as integers, but presented to us mere humans in a fashion that we comprehend as dates and/or times. e.g.

select YourTime7_field from yourtable;

will display a "default" time format, probably HH:MM;SS +0000000 and I don't think that default can be altered. You can however specify the format you want to see using convert e.g.
    CREATE TABLE Table1
    	([MyTime7] time(7))
    ;
    	
    INSERT INTO Table1
    	([MyTime7])
    VALUES
    	('23:35:45')
    ;

**Query 1**:

    select
      MyTime7
    , convert(varchar, MyTime7 ,9) am_pm_full_precision
    from table1
    

**[Results][2]**:
    
    |          MYTIME7 | AM_PM_FULL_PRECISION |
    |------------------|----------------------|
    | 23:35:45.0000000 |   11:35:45.0000000PM |



  [1]: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!6/2fd45/8

Open in new window

also see http://www.experts-exchange.com/Database/MS-SQL-Server/A_12315-SQL-Server-Date-Styles-formats-using-CONVERT.html
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