Solved

Can't create recovery drive in Windows 8.1

Posted on 2014-04-30
15
6,299 Views
Last Modified: 2014-04-30
I am using Windows 8.1 and want to create a recovery drive. I used the Disk Management program to create a 1.5gb partition and assigned letter "R" to the partition.
I then ran the recovery program, selected this partition and clicked next to begin. However, the program quickly responded that it was unable to create the recovery drive. (at this point, the system had removed letter "R" from the partition).

Am I doing something wrong? Do I need to prepare the partition differently?

Thank you.
0
Comment
Question by:Lev Seltzer
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
15 Comments
 
LVL 88

Expert Comment

by:rindi
ID: 40031811
For one, you probably need more than 1.5GB free space for the "recovery partition". The backup tool makes an image of your current installation, and Windows 8.1 needs something like 12GB space just for the OS without anything else. You are probably using more than that if you have installed software and have data on the same disk already. Although the backup image as far as I know does use compression and the image should be smaller than the original space used, it won't compress down to 1.5GB total.
0
 
LVL 93

Expert Comment

by:John Hurst
ID: 40031827
My recovery partition on my Windows 8 machine is 12.7 Gb, So I agree with the above.

It should work with more space, so check that first.

If you started with Windows 8 and upgraded to Windows 8.1 (different operating system), then it is possible something went wrong in the upgrade. I have seen that once before.
0
 

Author Comment

by:Lev Seltzer
ID: 40031829
the recovery tool said a minimum of 500mb, and the failure occurred immediately without any mention of insufficient space.

So while I might still run into such a problem, I feel that there is some other problem at this stage.
0
Ransomware-A Revenue Bonanza for Service Providers

Ransomware – malware that gets on your customers’ computers, encrypts their data, and extorts a hefty ransom for the decryption keys – is a surging new threat.  The purpose of this eBook is to educate the reader about ransomware attacks.

 

Author Comment

by:Lev Seltzer
ID: 40031845
I started with Windows 8 and upgraded to 8.1
So what could I do to fix this?
0
 
LVL 93

Accepted Solution

by:
John Hurst earned 500 total points
ID: 40031870
I have a Windows 8 Pro Laptop that I reimaged a while back on a new hard drive. That worked. Then I upgraded to Windows 8.1 and that is working (nearly a year later).

I just tried creating a Recovery drive on a USB key and that worked flawlessly.

However I cannot run a Windows 8 Refresh. The source files were apparently overwritten or deleted in the Windows 8.1 upgrade.

So I do not know precisely what went wrong except that something may have gone wrong in the Windows 8.1 upgrade.

Try making a Recovery Drive to a USB flash key. See if that works.
0
 

Author Comment

by:Lev Seltzer
ID: 40031888
I was able to create one on a USB Flash Key without a problem.
Does this mean that it won't work on the hard drive, and I'll need to set aside one USB flash key as a recovery drive?
0
 
LVL 93

Expert Comment

by:John Hurst
ID: 40031891
I have done some experimenting on and off (my system works perfectly well right now) and I have always created the recovery to a USB flash drive.

I have one for Windows 8 (useless now) and I just created a new one for Windows 8.1.1 and so I will set it aside.

Yes, I think that is the best approach as I would want a separate drive if I actually needed to recover.
0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:Lev Seltzer
ID: 40031899
I created the recovery drive on a USB KEY and abandoned the idea of creating it on a partition on the hard drive.
0
 
LVL 93

Expert Comment

by:John Hurst
ID: 40031908
@WEBuilder - Thank you. I think a separate USB key is a good way to go.
0
 
LVL 88

Expert Comment

by:rindi
ID: 40032642
It doesn't make too much sense to have it on the same disk as your OS is on. If the disk breaks and needs replacement, your recovery partition would also be gone.

Meanwhile I've done some testing. You can't put it on the same disk your OS is on, but you can put it on a 2nd physical disk installed in the PC. Also, if you have anything on that disk before you use the recovery option on it, that data will be lost. It removes any partition on that disk and creates a new one. If you don't select "copy the recovery partition..." option, then it will fit on a very small drive, but then all you can use the recovery drive for is to run options like fixboot or chkdsk etc, to make a system that isn't bootable anymore, bootable again for example. It won't restore your system. If you select the "copy the recovery partition...", then you will be able to restore the complete OS the way it was when you got the PC, but it will require lots of more space. But here you'll have to remember one thing, as the system was Windows 8 when you got it, it'll restore to Windows 8, even if you created the recovery disk from Windows 8.1. The reason for that is that the update wouldn't also have updated your OEM recovery partition, that is still the original...

So if you use that recovery disk to restore your system, you'll get Windows 8, as when you got the PC. And then you'll have to get all the updates, then update to windows 8.1, then get the updates for Windows 8.1... It'll take a long time.
0
 

Author Comment

by:Lev Seltzer
ID: 40032825
Thank you for the information. I'll have to purchase a new memory stick and dedicate it to being a recovery drive.
0
 
LVL 88

Expert Comment

by:rindi
ID: 40032850
I'd suggest you additionally get at least one further USB drive (probably better than a USB stick is a standard HD you can attach externally to the PC, either via a USB dock, or one that already comes in a USB case, and then use the normal System Image backup utility of Windows 8.1 (or using a 3rd party tool, like Paragon's backup and recovery tool, of which the free version works fine and can be used as long as you use this privately) to make a better backup from which you can immediately restore the system to it's current state (Windows 8.1, along with everything already installed, and the data). This would make the restore process a lot faster.
0
 
LVL 93

Expert Comment

by:John Hurst
ID: 40032905
If you need more space, multiple recovery disks and so on, a USB hard drive is a good option. We use these at clients. Using a USB stick works for a one time recovery drive which is why I suggested it, but the USB hard drive is also a good idea.
0
 
LVL 88

Expert Comment

by:rindi
ID: 40032928
Also, as all the Windows 8.1 recovery option does, is save the already existing OEM recovery partition to another disk, and as that partition never really changes, you don't have to repeat making it (you'd basically only be making a copy of the first recovery disk you made). It doesn't save your current installation or any data on it. For that you'd need a normal backup utility.

It is similar to what was provided with previous PC's, where when you bought a PC it had an OEM version of Windows 7 on it, and a recovery partition so you could restore the system back to factory defaults. For those PC's you had to use a manufacturer provided utility to create a set of recovery DVD's. As long as you didn't damage or loose those DVD's you only needed one set of them (actually manufacturers like HP made their tool so that you could only create one set). Now with Windows 8.x that isn't a tool provided by the manufacturer anymore (everyone had it's own tool and method of how it was used), but rather it is provided as part of the OS itself.
0
 

Author Comment

by:Lev Seltzer
ID: 40032944
thanks.
0

Featured Post

Optimizing Cloud Backup for Low Bandwidth

With cloud storage prices going down a growing number of SMBs start to use it for backup storage. Unfortunately, business data volume rarely fits the average Internet speed. This article provides an overview of main Internet speed challenges and reveals backup best practices.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Suggested Solutions

Using the Hyper-V Manager requires administrator rights. This guide shows how to add shortcuts and Start Screen tiles for normal users to quickly connect to local virtual machines rather than using the recommended Remote Desktop connection.
The default behavior of the User Account Control (UAC) dialog is to disable (gray-out) the rest of the desktop when prompting for elevation. This is known as secure desktop. There are reasons that you may want to disable this secure desktop behavior…
With the advent of Windows 10, Microsoft is pushing a Get Windows 10 icon into the notification area (system tray) of qualifying computers. There are many reasons for wanting to remove this icon. This two-part Experts Exchange video Micro Tutorial s…
The Task Scheduler is a powerful tool that is built into Windows. It allows you to schedule tasks (actions) on a recurring basis, such as hourly, daily, weekly, monthly, at log on, at startup, on idle, etc. This video Micro Tutorial is a brief intro…

777 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question