IP addressing

is this 10.0.7.253/32 a valid network address? and if so, wha t is the assignable IP in this network block.
SydNal2009Asked:
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tolinromeCommented:
No, its not. the IP 10.0.7.253 cannot have a /32. The high est you can go on the mask bits are a /30, which would only give you 2 hosts anyway.
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Don JohnstonInstructorCommented:
is this 10.0.7.253/32 a valid network address?
That depends on who is asking and what is their definition of "network address".  Put another way, some context would be helpful.

For example, you could assign that address to an interface on a router. In which case it is both a network and host address.  There can be no other hosts on that network.  So it's not practical or realistic on an actual physical interface, but it can be done.  In fact, it's actually a common practice on loopback interfaces with some routing protocols.

But once again, it depends on the situation.
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acesover2000Commented:
10.0.7.253/32 is just CIDR notation for the single IP address 10.0.7.253
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tolinromeCommented:
you still wouldnt be able to use a /32 with that IP though. Maybe the OP can tell us what the problem is and we can assist?
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Don JohnstonInstructorCommented:
you still wouldnt be able to use a /32 with that IP though.
Sure you can. But like I said, it would depend on the scenario as to why.
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Jan SpringerCommented:
That is not only a valid address, I use /32s on loopback interfaces everywhere.
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Kent WSr. Network / Systems AdminCommented:
/32 is a valid address for a single IP. (ditto of 255.255.255.255).   IT IS it's own network block.  /31 = network marker / broadcast, but no usable host range.  /32 means "I am everything for my own IP".
How it talks to other things on your network completely depends on your network setup.  You will need some routing solution / gateway because basically nothing else can talk host-to-host with a /32.

More info on your error or what you are trying to achieve may gain you better insight.
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