WiFi Repeater - use same SSID name?

Hi,

when setting up a WiFi repeater, should I use the same SSID/PW as the original WiFI router, or should I choose a different name and PW?

if I choose the same SSID/PW, are devices like laptops smart enough to seamlessly choose the SSID that has the strongest signal?

thanks in advance.
Go-BruinsAsked:
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RantCanSr. Systems AdministratorCommented:
What kind of radio are you using? That will determine best placement and channel choices.  You are correct that identical an SSID will propagate.
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surly1966Commented:
I have done it that way for many years and it always has worked for me, I really haven't had  any issues.  I do try to use AP mode if one of the routers has it. and I use different channels so I can differentiate which router I'm running from if I have to troubleshoot. My devices don't seem to have any issue finding the strongest signal as long as I have automatically connect set  in the wi-fi profile.
Good luck
Surly
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Go-BruinsAuthor Commented:
I'm using a basic repeater.

http://www.amazon.com/HooToo%C2%AE-HT-WR04-Wireless-Repeater-Extender/dp/B00HG7G8N8/ref=sr_1_1?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1405095531&sr=1-1&keywords=hootoo+repeater

My main router's IP is 192.168.1.1.

The repeater's IP address for setup was 192.168.10.1

I got it to work, but one of my frustrations is - I can no longer access the repeater at the 192.168.10.1 address. And my main router doesn't show the repeater's IP addy in the DHCP pool, so I have no idea how to get to the repeater.
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Craig BeckCommented:
If you're just adding a second access point and connecting it to the first access point via Ethernet cable you can just configure the same SSID and encryption/authentication and set a different channel on each.

You should set the second AP with an IP address in the 192.168.1.x range which is outside of the DHCP scope on the first router.  To get back to the second AP to change its IP address just set your PC with a static IP of 192.168.10.2 / 255.255.255.0 and try to connect to it again.  When you change the IP apply the changes and set your PC to use DHCP again.
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Go-BruinsAuthor Commented:
Does the repeater even jump into the main router's DHCP pool?
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AkinsdNetwork AdministratorCommented:
The repeater would have acquired an IP in the same range as the main router.
they have to be on the same network to communicate.

You can find the IP of the repeater by scanning your network
- Download Advanced IP Scanner
http://www.advanced-ip-scanner.com/

- Scan the subnet the router is on.

You'll find your repeater in the result
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Craig BeckCommented:
Repeaters (or other access points) don't need to be on the same subnet - they are bridges so don't rely on IP connectivity to communicate unless they're participating in WDS and using RADIUS.
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Go-BruinsAuthor Commented:
Ok, but once everything is set up, how does one log into the repeater to make changes, etc.?

If my main router is 192.168.1.1.
And the original repeater address from the factory is 192.168.10.1 (and it doesn't become part of the subnet)

Assuming that my computer has been given an IP address of 192.168.1.XX, do I need to connect to the repeater by connecting with LAN cable, then doing a ipconfig/ release, then an ipconfig/renew? That's the only way I can reach the repeater, correct?

Or, is it better to force an IP address to the repeater that's part of the subnet? Is that what most admins do?
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Craig BeckCommented:
Or, is it better to force an IP address to the repeater that's part of the subnet? Is that what most admins do?
Yup, that's exactly what you should do.

You could leave it as-is if you want, and just give your PC/Laptop a static IP address when you want to administer it.

Assuming that my computer has been given an IP address of 192.168.1.XX, do I need to connect to the repeater by connecting with LAN cable, then doing a ipconfig/ release, then an ipconfig/renew? That's the only way I can reach the repeater, correct?
If the second repeater is doing DHCP you can plug in to it with a cable and get an IP address.  Disconnect the repeater from the original one first, then log in to the new repeater, disable the DHCP server then change its IP address.  Then you would reconnect the new repeater to the original repeater and you will get an IP address from the original router no matter which one you wirelessly connect to.
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Go-BruinsAuthor Commented:
Good stuff. Thank you.
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