how much optics power an incadecent lamp emits in 1260-1360nm range

Hello,

I would like to know how much power an incandescent lamp (say 150W) emits in 1260-1360nm range.
If there is more suitable easily accessible source of light for this range, I am interested to know too.

I don't necessarily need to know the exact figure, I need to know how it compares with 7dbm (much more than that, much less), etc.

From some arbitrary sources on Internet [1] it appears the lamp emits mostly in 500-2500nm range, which is 2000nm wide. My target range is 100nm. Ignoring it is non-uniform, and perhaps some finer details I should have remembered from my university optics courses, I gather some 1/20th of original power will appear in 1260-1360nm range, for 150W lamp it is 7.5W. Which seems to be some 3 orders of magnitude more than 5mW ([2]).

I appreciate it if someone with good knowledge of optics can tell if this makes sense, and offer same explanations in a language appropriate for optics domain.

Also, I'm comparing directional laser diode light source with omni-directional lamp. I'll post another question for that.

Best regards,
Alex

[1] http://physicsed.buffalostate.edu/pubs/TPT/TPTDec99Filament.pdf
[2] http://www.rapidtables.com/convert/power/dBm_to_Watt.htm
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gremwellAsked:
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d-glitchCommented:
Your calculation (dividing the total power by 20 based on bandwidth considerations) probably gives a conservative estimate of the in-band power since the band of interest is near the peak of spectral curve.

So yes, the lamp gives off more than 1000x more in-band power than a 5 mW laser.

But the laser can certainly deliver much higher power density (watt per area) than the bulb.
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