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SCOM 2012 - Managing Server

Morning,

We have recently setup System Center Ops Manager 2012 in our environment. The install went fine without any known issues during installation. We have began adding servers (manually) to manage and imported the necessary management packs for those servers. (Windows base pack, File Resource pack, and SQL Services pack)

The servers are currently online and are showing a healthy status in the SCOM console. However there is little to no data being populated for either the file server or sql server I am using for testing. (Screenshot attached)

I'm new to working with System Center so I apologize. Perhaps I have a misconfiguration somewhere, just not sure where is could possibly be. (Since the console is reporting a healthy status..)

Any help provided would be great.

Thanks.
SCOM-1.png
SCOM-2.png
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victory2201
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victory2201
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Mike TLeading EngineerCommented:
Hi,

That is just the status of the agent on the target machine. You need to look at "Alerts" on the left hand side for events, either warning or critical. If that is empty then it might simply be your environment is healthy for now.
Digging into any the nodes down the left will present lots of data which will confirm whether SCOM is collecting anything.

Mike
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victory2201Author Commented:
Mike,

Thank you for your response. The only alerts I see are for my sql server telling me there is an authentication issue with accessing the database with the credentials pre-defined when I installed the agent.

However should I see informational events as well for the servers? I added a few more file and sql servers into the mix last night but I don't see the results I should be seeing. (or at least I don't believe I am..)
scom-sql.png
scom-ws.png
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Mike TLeading EngineerCommented:
Hi,

The SQL alert is complaining because you have not configured the runas profile yet. The runas profiles are absolutely critical to get SCOM working. It's essentially the account agents need to use to capture or gather events. For SQL the server you have installed SQL on will need an account with specific rights to the database.

The "man" for most SCOM things is Kevin Holman and he writes lots of detailed blog articles. He has one for SQL:
<http://blogs.technet.com/b/kevinholman/archive/2010/09/08/configuring-run-as-accounts-and-profiles-in-r2-a-sql-management-pack-example.aspx>

As for your alerts being empty - that is entirely normal. I think you've installed it fine from your screenshots. Seeing "nothing" just means nothing bad is happening on those servers you have agents on. SCOM collects statistics and things that go wrong: these are flagged as warnings or red critical events.
The "Active alerts" tab is a view that is a pre-defined filter for the bad things that are occuring for specific classes. The classes are the nodes in the tree, like SQL, Windows Servers, etc.

If you click on Operating System Performance (one below in the screenshot) you will get plenty of info such as disk writes, processor utilisation etc.

Question for you: what were you expecting or wanting to see??

Note, I've only been using SCOM for about a year but I've learnt that with SCOM you need to go slowly. Let it brew. By that I mean let it sit there for a week or three doing it's thing and get an idea of what your servers are doing. Baselining I guess. Once you know what events you want to concentrate on, then you tune the rules until you're happy. Sometimes there's too much noise as in it reports far too many events you have no interest in. Just turn them off. You can always turn them on again. You do that through overrides, just make sure you create your own company management pack and save overrides to that.

Mike
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victory2201Author Commented:
Mike,

Thanks again for your response. (And the link)

Originally I was expecting to see basically a complete data dump from the server event logs. (I suppose this comes from working with syslog servers in the past, which natively dump mass amounts of data to you and then you filter through it on what you want to look for)

After reading into the elements of SCOM further, that does not appear to be the case. SCOM seems to only provide relevant data that an admin would generally want to see. (Warning events, errors, etc.) I don't see where is provides much detail from standard "Informational" messages. (Unless I am mistaken?)

I have been receiving several new messages from the few servers I associated recently.  Like you mentioned, it seems that giving the system time seems to be the key here.
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Mike TLeading EngineerCommented:
Hi,

You're welcome.
Yes, you're right regarding informational data. I was going to mention - it's not like the eventlog (or syslogs) where you can see everything. It's an abstracted view of things that are either a problem or are going to be a problem unless you act - e.g. disk full etc. The power comes from the management packs in what it will let you monitor. It could be your network hardware, SQL or Exchange. I would definitely not add any more though until you have a really good understanding of the base ones (OS and SQL). Learn them, tune them and watch them and the SCOM box itself. Then when you're happy grow the scope. If you rush the server can get drowned with rules and monitors, your alerts will explode into a sea of red and you'll be fire-fighting.
Time is definitely the key.

Mike
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victory2201Author Commented:
Thanks for all your help Mike, greatly appreciated.
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Mike TLeading EngineerCommented:
You're welcome. Thanks for the points :).
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